Author of the Month

Happy birthday to our favorite children's authors! Every month we celebrate those amazing writers and illustrators who call on their talents and life experiences to create books that kids love. Read on to learn more about their lives and livelihoods.

Authors by their birthday month: January -- February -- March -- April -- May -- June -- July -- August -- September -- October -- November -- December
Thu, 01/28/2016 - 3:35pm

It was her third grade teacher who showed Peggy Rathmann that reading could be fun. She had spent the first two grades squinting at the blackboard, trying to make out the alphabet with her nearsighted eyes. But her third grade teacher used pictures to tell stories, and when Peggy grew up to be a famous illustrator, she made sure that her big, bold pictures were clearly outlined in black ink so the kids in the back of the class could see them clearly.

Mon, 01/11/2016 - 1:08pm

Jacqueline Woodson was born on February 12, 1963, in Columbus, Ohio. She had her growing up days in both South Carolina and Brooklyn, New York. One reason that she writes is because she believes that "language can change the world."

When she was young, she rarely saw books that had pictures of people who looked like her or her family or her friends. Her books have helped to fill in that gap, making it easier for libraries to succeed in their mission of letting every child find herself or himself in a book.

Fri, 12/18/2015 - 2:57pm

Without Jacob and Wilhelm’s efforts to gather folk tales from their German homeland and making them popular worldwide, it’s unlikely we’d know Sleeping Beauty, Hansel and Gretel, Rapunzel, or Snow White.

Mon, 11/30/2015 - 7:05pm

Born December 11, 1957, William (Bill) Joyce's dream is to be remembered for "a significant contribution to the cause of global silliness." (Publisher's Weekly)
His books, TV shows and movies, from George Shrinks to Robots to The Rise of the Guardians have amazed and amused audiences for over 20 years.

Mon, 10/26/2015 - 2:51pm

Marcia Sewall's name can be found on the covers of many books in the library. She has a simple drawing style that conveys the rhythm and characters of the stories without overwhelming them. Whether the subject is something light-hearted, such as Daisy's Taxi, or bold retellings of Thanksgiving history, Marcia's drawings give the books a clarity that works beautifully with their storylines.

Tue, 10/13/2015 - 9:42am

Get the creepy crawlies with R. L. Stine. He's a master of conjuring things that go bump in the dark—and lurk in dark waters. In The Curse of Camp Cold Lake, Sarah has found a way to get even with her mean bunkmates, but she's the one who's in for a shock. Think you're beyond all that? So did Courtney. She tells everybody how brave she is, and Eddie is tired of it. He knows there's one thing she is afraid of. The monsters at Muddy Creek. Too bad for Eddie that Courtney is right again in You Can't Scare Me

Welcome to R.L. Stine's world. It's easy to make friends here. But they're usually the wrong kind of friends.

Tue, 09/01/2015 - 2:15pm

Jim Murphy is one of those amazing authors who can introduce the past to new generations with his fiction and non-fiction works. Whether it’s an unsuspecting 18th-century port town about to get hit by yellow fever, the Big Apple shut down by a blizzard, or a fire that burned down a lot of Chicago, Mr. Murphy brings readers into the thick of events with a storytelling style that holds their attention.

Want to time travel with Jim Murphy? Click here to see which of his books we have in store for you at the library. Read on for some facts on his life, articles featuring him, and a sample from his book, An American Plague.

Mon, 08/03/2015 - 10:24am

"...that’s the fun of it to create from scratch, it’s to me, it’s creative in one sense of the word. I try to make exciting books for children and of course, I do them for myself too, I put everything I have into them."*

There was a stuffed bear in a department store who was missing a button, but a little girl loved him anyway. She didn’t want a perfect companion. She wanted Corduroy.  Don Freeman’s stories about the plucky bear and his friend are still treasured and shared decades after they were written. A true classic, Corduroy can found in pretty much every library and book store with space set aside for young ones.

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