If you like The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

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The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho is a "simple, yet eloquent parable [that] celebrates the richness of the human spirit. A young Spanish shepherd seeking his destiny travels to Egypt where he learns many lessons, particularly from a wise old alchemist. The real alchemy here, however, is the transmuting of youthful idealism into mature wisdom. The blending of conventional ideas with an exotic setting makes old truths seem new again. This shepherd takes the advice Hamlet did not heed, learning to trust his heart and commune with it as a treasured friend. " (School Library Journal)

If you like The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho, you may also like these titles:
 

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Last American ManThe Last American Man by Elizabeth Gilbert.
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The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran.
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Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
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Virginia Johnson, CRRL's Web content librarian, also reviewed the book here.