If You Like The Fairy Godmother by Mercedes Lackey

 If you liked "The Fairy Godmother" by Mercedes Lackey for the way it played with the traditions of fairy tales, you may enjoy these titles:

"Little, Big" by John Crowley

One of my all-time favorite books - big, romantic; with plotlines following many characters:

"Edgewood is many houses, all put inside each other, or across each other. It's filled with and surrounded by mystery and enchantment: the further in you go, the bigger it gets. Smoky Barnable, who has fallen in love with Daily Alice Drinkwater, comes to Edgewood, her family home, where he finds himself drawn into a world of magical strangeness."

 

"Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West" by Gregory Maguire

"When Dorothy triumphed over the Wicked Witch of the West in L. Frank Baum's classic tale, we heard only her side of the story. But what about her arch-nemesis, the mysterious Witch? Where did she come from? How did she become so wicked? And what is the true nature of evil? Gregory Maguire creates a fantasy world so rich and vivid that we will never look at Oz the same way again."-catalog summary

 

"The Goose Girl" by Shannon Hale

"On her way to marry a prince she's never met, Princess Anidori is betrayed by her guards and her lady-in-waiting and must become a goose girl to survive until she can reveal her true identity and reclaim the crown that is rightfully hers."-catalog summary

 

"Lords and Ladies" by Terry Pratchett

"When an infestation of Faerie Trash invades the Kingdom of Lancre, upsetting the royal wedding plans of King Verence and his favorite witch, Magrat Garlick, it's up to the witches, led by Granny Weatherwax, to deal with the vicious little things."

 

"Stardust" by Neil Gaiman

"Young Tristran Thorn has fallen in love with beautiful Victoria Forester and in order to win her hand, he must retrieve a fallen star from the land of faerie and deliver it to her."-catalog summary

 

"The Last Unicorn" by Peter S. Beagle

"The unicorn in the lilac wood discovers that she is the last unicorn in the world, and sets off to find the others. She meets Schmendrick the Magician--whose magic seldom works, and never as he intended--when he rescues her from Mommy Fortuna's Midnight Carnival, where only some of the mythical beasts displayed are illusions. They are joined by Molly Grue, who believes in legends despite her experiences with a Robin Hood wannabe and his unmerry men. Ahead wait King Haggard and his Red Bull, who banished unicorns from the land."-Amazon.com summary

 

"Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell" by Susanna Clarke

"Centuries ago, when magic still existed in England, the greatest magician of them all was the Raven King. A human child brought up by fairies, the Raven King blended fairy wisdom and human reason to create English magic. Now, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, he is barely more than a legend, and England, with its mad King and its dashing poets, no longer believes in practical magic. Then the reclusive Mr. Norrell of Hurtfew Abbey appears and causes the statues of York Cathedral to speak and move. News spreads of the return of magic to England and, persuaded that he must help the government in the war against Napoleon, Mr. Norrell goes to London. There he meets a brilliant young magician and takes him as a pupil. Jonathan Strange is charming, rich and arrogant. Together, they dazzle the country with their feats.
But the partnership soon turns to rivalry. Mr. Norrell has never conquered his lifelong habits of secrecy, while Strange will always be attracted to the wildest, most perilous magic. He becomes fascinated by the shadowy figure of the Raven King, and his heedless pursuit of long-forgotten magic threatens, not only his partnership with Norrell, but everything that he holds dear." --FROM THE PUBLISHER

 

"War for the Oaks" by Emma Bull

"Eddi McCandry sings rock and roll. But her boyfriend just dumped her, her band just broke up, and life could hardly be worse. Then, walking home through downtown Minneapolis on a dark night, she finds herself drafted into an invisible war between the faerie folk. Now, more than her own survival is at risk--and her own preferences, musical and personal, are very much beside the point. By turns tough and lyrical, fabulous and down-to-earth, "War for the Oaks" is a fantasy novel that's as much about this world as about the other one. It's about real love and loyalty, about real music and musicians, about false glamour and true art. It will change the way you hear and see your own daily life."-catalog summary