If you like The Places In Between by Rory Stewart

The Places In Between
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The Places In Between by Rory Stewart: "In January 2002 Rory Stewart walked across Afghanistan-surviving by his wits, his knowledge of Persian dialects and Muslim customs, and the kindness of strangers. By day he passed through mountains covered in nine feet of snow, hamlets burned and emptied by the Taliban, and communities thriving amid the remains of medieval civilizations. By night he slept on villagers' floors, shared their meals, and listened to their stories of the recent and ancient past" (Book Description).
 
If you enjoyed this book, here are some other titles you may enjoy:
 
Arabian Sands by Wilfred Thesiger
Wilfred Thesiger, repulsed by what he saw as the softness and rigidity of Western life - 'the machines, the calling cards, the meticulously aligned streets' - spent years exploring in and around the vast, waterless desert that is the 'Empty Quarter' of Arabia. Travelling amongst the Bedu people, he experienced their everyday challenges of hunger and thirst, the trials of long marches beneath the relentless sun, the bitterly cold nights and the constant danger of death if it was discovered he was a Christian 'infidel'. He was the first European to visit most of the region, and just before he left the area the process that would change it forever had begun - the discovery of oil. (catalog description)
 
Author recounts his travels through thirteen Muslim countries in the Middle East: the ordinary people, the conflicts, and the land. (worldcat.org)
 
 
 
 
 
 
From the Holy Mountain by William Dalrymple
In 587 AD, two monks set off on an extraordinary journey that would take them in an arc across the entire Byzantine world, from the shores of the Bosphorus to the sand dunes of Egypt. On the way, John Moschos and his pupil Sophronius the Sophist stayed in caves, monasteries, and remote hermitages, collecting the wisdom of the stylites and the desert fathers before their fragile world finally shattered under the great eruption of Islam. More than a thousand years later, using Moschos's writings as his guide, William Dalrymple sets off to retrace their footsteps. (catalog description)
 
Every time Bill Bryson walks out the door memorable travel literature threatens to break out. His previous excursion up, down, and over the Appalachian Trail (well, most of it) resulted in the sublime national bestsellerA Walk in the Woods. Now he has traveled across the world and all the way Down Under to Australia, a shockingly under-discovered country with the friendliest inhabitants, the hottest, driest weather, and the most peculiar and lethal wildlife to be found on the planet. (catalog description)
 
 
Shipwrecked while sailing to Athens by way of the Red Sea, Hansen buried his notebooks in a Dacron sail bag for safe-keeping. Leaving them behind in a hurried rescue made possible by a boatload of smugglers blown off course, he returned ten years later to dig up his past and discover why this ancient country had left an indelible print on his mind. (catalog description)
 
The view was colossal. Below us on every side mountains surged away it seemed forever; we looked down on glaciers and snow-covered peaks that perhaps no one has ever seen before, except from the air.' Feeling restless in the world of London's high-fashion industry, Eric Newby asked an old friend to accompany him on a mountain-climbing expedition in the wild and remote Hindu Kush, in north-eastern Afghanistan. (catalog description)
 
 

Part historical evocation, part travelogue, and part personal quest, An Unexpected Light is the account of Elliot's journey through Afghanistan, a country considered off-limits to travelers for twenty years. Aware of the risks involved, but determined to explore what he could of the Afghan people and culture, Elliot leaves the relative security of Kabul. He travels by foot and on horseback, and hitches rides on trucks that eventually lead him into the snowbound mountains of the North toward Uzbekistan, the former battlefields of the Soviet army's "hidden war." (catalog description)
 
 
Roughing It by Mark Twain
Marking a crucial phase in the author's life and career, Roughing It vividly recounts Twain's adventures in the West. Twain blends autobiography and tall tale to produce this engaging humorous account of six boisterous years in Nevada, San Francisco, and Hawaii. Genteel culture meets frontier culture head-on in this wildly inventive, high-spirited book, and neither will ever be the same. (catalog description)
 
 
 
When Peter Carey offered to take his son to Japan, 12-year-old Charley stipulated no temples or museums. He wanted to see manga , anime ,and cool, weird stuff. His father said yes. Out of that bargain comes this enchanting tour of the mansion of Japanese culture, as entered through its garish, brightly lit back door. Guided-and at times judged-by an ineffably strange boy named Takashi, the Careys meet manga artists and anime directors, the meticulous impersonators called "visualists," and solitary, nerdish otaku (catalog description)