If you like a variety of YA books

I tried to find books based on your recent reading of "The
Adoration of Jenna Fox", "Remembering Raquel", "Waiting for Normal", and "The Boy Who Dared". It seems you read a wide variety of books, so I picked books from all sorts of genres. I hope some of these titles sound interesting!
 

"Dust" by Arthur Slade

Eleven-year-old Robert is the only one who can help when a mysterious stranger arrives, performing tricks and promising to bring rain, at the same time children begin to disappear from a dust bowl farm town in Saskatchewan in the 1930s


"Green Angel" by Alice Hoffman

Haunted by grief and by her past after losing her family in a fire, fifteen-year-old Green retreats into her ruined garden as she struggles to survive emotionally and physically on her own.


"So B. It" by Sarah Weeks

When a friendly stranger yells "get a life," 13-year-old Heidi realizes she is on her way cross-country to do just that, and to solve the riddle of "soof," one of only 23 words in her mother's vocabulary. A satisfying read filled with humor and sorrow.


"London Calling" by Edward Bloor

Seventh-grader Martin Conway believes that his life is monotonous and dull until the night the antique radio he uses as a night-light transports him to the bombing of London in 1940.


"City of Ember" by Dupreau

In a post-apocalypse city on the verge of collapse, 12-year-olds Lina and Doon join forces to flee to an unknown world above ground. A fast-paced story with appeal for younger fantasy readers.


Airborn by Kenneth Oppel

"Matt Cruse is a cabin boy on the Aurora, a huge airship that sails hundreds of feet above the ocean, ferrying wealthy passengers from city to city. It is the life Matt's always wanted; convinced he's lighter than air, he imagines himself as buoyant as the hydrium gas that powers his ship. One night he meets a dying balloonist who speaks of beautiful creatures drifting through the skies. It is only after Matt meets the balloonist's granddaughter that he realizes that the man's ravings may, in fact, have been true, and that the creatures are completely real and utterly mysterious. In a swashbuckling adventure reminiscent of Jules Verne and Robert Louis Stevenson, Kenneth Oppel, author of the best-selling Silverwing trilogy, creates an imagined world in which the air is populated by transcontinental voyagers, pirates, and beings never before dreamed of by the humans who sail the skies."-catalog summary