Folktales of the American Indians

Magic Words: Poems

By Edward Field (editor)

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A collection of poems based on songs and stories gathered by Knud Rasmussen on the Fifth Thule Expedition, which recorded Inuit legends about the universe and its creation.

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Mole's Hill: A Woodland Tale

By Lois Ehlert

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When Fox tells Mole she must move out of her tunnel to make way for a new path, Mole finds an ingenious way to save her home.

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Monster Birds: A Navajo Folktale

By Vee Browne

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Twelve-year-old twins use their weapons, lightning arrows and magic feathers, to defend their village from the Monster Birds.

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Paper Animal Masks From Northwest Tribal Tales

By Nancy Lyn Rudolph

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Masks that are simple and fast to make with materials usually found around the house. Could be used for school or scout projects.

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Quail Song: A Pueblo Indian Tale

By Valerie Scho Carey

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Quail grows tired of trying to teach hungry Coyote her beautiful song, so she plays a trick on him.

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Raven's Light: A Myth From the People of the Northwest Coast

By Susan Hand Shetterly

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Explains how Raven made the earth, animals, moon, and sun.

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Raven: A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest

By Gerald McDermott

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Raven, a Pacific Coast Indian trickster, sets out to find the sun.

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Sedna: An Eskimo Myth

By Beverly Brodsky

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Sedna, mother of all sea animals, tells the story of her life and helps the starving Inuit.

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The Blind Boy and the Loon, and Other Eskimo Myths

By Ramona Maher

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Eleven Inuit legends and tales from the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions include "How Thunder and Lightning Came to Be," "The Hardhearted Rich Man," and "The Sea Otter Girl."

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The Boy Who Found the Light: Eskimo Folktales Retold and Illustrated with Wood Engravings

By Dale DeArmond

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Three stories tell of how a magic gift allows a young boy to bring light to the world and how a famous trickster got tricked himself. In the last story, a boy makes a journey to the edge of day, where earth and sky meet, and releases many animals, plants, and forces of nature into the world.
Includes a glossary of unfamiliar Inuit words.

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