Days of Sail

The Way of a Ship: A Square-Rigger Voyage in the Last Days of Sail

By Derek Lundy

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When, as a young man in the 1880s, Benjamin Lundy signed up for unimaginably hard duty aboard a...commercial sailing vessel -- one destined for a treacherous, white-knuckle passage around...Cape Horn -- he had no idea that his experience would also provide a window into an epochal transition that would fundamentally change man's relation to the sea.

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Treasure Island

By Robert Louis Stevenson

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While going through the possessions of a deceased guest who owed them money, the mistress of the inn and her son find a treasure map that leads to a pirate fortune as well as great danger.

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Two Years Before the Mast

By Richard Henry Dana

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The narrative of the author's journey from Boston around the Cape Horn and landing at a port in the western coast of the United States. A classic work of non-fiction that inspired Melville.

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Wake of the Perdido Star

By Gene Hackman and Daniel Lenihan

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When his parents are murdered, 17-year-old Jack O'Reilly joins the crew of the Perdido Star, facing "storms, shipwreck, hostile and friendly natives, and enemy vessels," eventually leading a renegade band called the Right Honourable Brotherhood of Shipwrecked Men.

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Westward, Ho!

By Charles Kingsley

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This vibrant novel captures the daring spirit of adventurers who sailed with Sir Francis Drake, and this new edition features text reset in the original typeface and full-color illustrations reproduced from the original canvases.

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Women Sailors & Sailors' Women: An Untold Maritime History

By David Cordingly

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"In this illuminating historical narrative, maritime scholar David Cordingly shows that in fact an astonishing number of women went to sea in the great age of sail. Some traveled as the wives or mistresses of captains. A few were smuggled aboard by officers or seaman. A number of cases have come to light of young women dressing in men's clothes and working alongside the sailors for months, and sometimes years. In the U.S. and Britsh navies, it was not uncommon for the wives of bosuns, carpenters, and cooks to go to sea on warships. Cordingly's tremendous research shows that there was indeed a thriving female population--from female pirates to the sirens of legend--on and around the high seas."

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