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Clarissa; or, The History of a Young Lady

By Samuel Richardson

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In this classic eighteenth-century epistolary novel, Clarissa's family tries to marry her off and a city gentleman tries to seduce her.
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Dear Stranger, Dearest Friend

By Laney Katz Becker

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Two very different women meet in a chat room about breast cancer. Their e-mails form a friendship and bond as they learn to laugh and cry together about the absurdities, pain, and most of all, the love that life can bring.
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Disobedience

By Jane Hamilton

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"Reading someone else's e-mail is a quiet, clean enterprise. There is no pitterpattering around the room, no opening and closing the desk drawers, no percussive creasing as you draw the paper from the envelope and unfold it. There is no sound but the melody of dial-up, the purity of the following Gregorian tones, and the sweet nihilistic measure of static."

Teenager Henry reads his mother's e-mail and shakes the foundations of his family.

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Dog Years

By Gunter Grass

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In this vast novel, packed with incident, Gunter Grass traces the dark labyrinth of the German mentality as it developed during the rise, fall, and aftermath of the Third Reich.
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Dracula

By Bram Stoker

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This classic vampire novel will hold you in suspense and keep your heart pounding to the very end.

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E, a Novel

By Matt Beaumont

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Backstabbing, office politics, and corporate intrigue in an advertising agency vying for the almighty Coca-Cola account. E-mails fly with sexual innuendoes, sly insults, and downright lies as the employees claw their way up and down the corporate ladder.

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Fair and Tender Ladies

By Lee Smith

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Ivy Rowe may not have much education, but her thoughts are classic, and her experiences are fascinating. Born near the turn of the century in the Virginia Mountains, Ivy's story is told completely through letters she is forever writing, and that you will forever want to read....

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Gilead

By Marilynne Robinson

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"In 1956, toward the end of Reverend John Ames's life, he begins a letter to his young son, an account of himself and his forebears. Ames is the son of an Iowa preacher and the grandson of a minister who, as a young man in Maine, saw a vision of Christ bound in chains and came west to Kansas to fight for abolition: He 'preached men into the Civil War,' then, at age fifty, became a chaplain in the Union Army, losing his right eye in battle. Reverend Ames writes to his son about the tension between his father - an ardent pacifist--and his grandfather, whose pistol and bloody shirts, concealed in an army blanket, may be relics from the fight between the abolitionists and those settlers who wanted to vote Kansas into the union as a slave state. And he tells a story of the sacred bonds between fathers and sons, which are tested in his tender and strained relationship with his namesake, John Ames Boughton, his best friend's wayward son.

"This is also the tale of another remarkable vision--not a corporeal vision of God but the vision of life as a wondrously strange creation. It tells how wisdom was forged in Ames's soul during his solitary life, and how history lives through generations, pervasively present even when betrayed and forgotten."

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Griffin & Sabine: An Extraordinary Correspondence

By Nick Bantock

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Griffin: It's good to get in touch with you at last. Could I have one of your fish postcards? I think you were right -- the wine glass has more impact than the cup. --Sabine

"But Griffin had never met a woman named Sabine. How did she know him? How did she know his artwork? Who is she? Thus begins the strange and intriguing correspondence of Griffin and Sabine. And since each letter must be pulled from its own envelope, the reader has the delightful, forbidden sensation of reading someone else's mail. Griffin & Sabine is like no other illustrated novel: appealing to the poet and artist in everyone and sure to inspire a renaissance in the fine art of letter-writing, it tells an extraordinary story in an extraordinary way."

Sequels include Sabine's Notebook and The Golden Mean.

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Letters from Cleo and Tyrone: A Feline Perspective on Love, Life, and Litter

By L. Virginia Browne

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Cleo and Tyrone, two cats, take time between naps and feline mayhem to e-mail each other and share their views on catnip fields, fashion, poetry, tummy rubs, fashion and their owners.

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