The Super Seventies

Fashions of a Decade. The 1970s

By Jacqueline Herald

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Looks at how the fashions of the 1970s reflected the social, historical and cultural events of that decade.

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Gerald R. Ford

By Douglas Brinkley

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"The 'accidental' president whose innate decency and steady hand restored the presidency after its greatest crisis When Gerald R. Ford entered the White House in August 1974, he inherited a presidency tarnished by the Watergate scandal, the economy was in a recession, the Vietnam War was drawing to a close, and he had taken office without having been elected. Most observers gave him little chance of success, especially after he pardoned Richard Nixon just a month into his presidency, an action that outraged many Americans, but which Ford thought was necessary to move the nation forward.

"Many people today think of Ford as a man who stumbled a lot--clumsy on his feet and in politics--but acclaimed historian Douglas Brinkley shows him to be a man of independent thought and conscience, who never allowed party loyalty to prevail over his sense of right and wrong. As a young congressman, he stood up to the isolationists in the Republican leadership, promoting a vigorous role for America in the world. Later, as House minority leader and as president, he challenged the right wing of his party, refusing to bend to their vision of confrontation with the Communist world. And after the fall of Saigon, Ford also overruled his advisers by allowing Vietnamese refugees to enter the United States, arguing that to do so was the humane thing to do. Brinkley draws on exclusive interviews with Ford and on previously unpublished documents (including a remarkable correspondence between Ford and Nixon stretching over four decades), fashioning a masterful reassessment of Gerald R. Ford's presidency and his underappreciated legacy to the nation."

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Historical Dictionary of the 1970s

By James S. Olson, editor

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"An encyclopedic overview of the era, this book includes entries on the prominent people and significant events, issues and controversies of the decade, and entries on the film, music, and culture of the period. A chronology provides a time line for the events of the 1970s."
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Hollywood, Beverly Hills, & Other Perversities: Pop Culture of the 1970s and 1980s

By George Rose

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A collection of black-and-white photographs portraying celebrity culture in the 1970s and 1980s, mostly in Los Angeles, taken by an award-winning photojournalist.

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How We Got Here: The 70's, the decade that Brought You Modern Life (For Better or Worse)

By David Frum

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"A sweeping condemnation of the decline of American culture since the 1970s by one of America's leading conservative writers.

"For many, the 1970s evoke the Brady Bunch and the birth of disco. In this first, thematic popular history of the decade, David Frum argues that it was the 1970s, not the 1960s, that created modern America and altered the American personality forever. A society that had valued faith, self-reliance, self-sacrifice, and family loyalty evolved in little more than a decade into one characterized by superstition, self-interest, narcissism, and guilt.

"Frum examines this metamorphosis through the rise to cultural dominance of faddish psychology, astrology, drugs, religious cults, and consumer debt, and profiles such prominent players of the decade as Werner Erhard, Alex Comfort, and Jerry Brown. How We Got Here is lively and provocative reading."

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Images of Elvis Presley in American Culture, 1977-1997: The Mystery Terrain

By George Plasketes

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Pop culture writer George Plaskets speaks of the "mystery terrain" of American culture since Elvis Presley began his second career in 1977. Whether you think of him as the king or kitsch or why he has dominated our culture, this is the book for you. Included is a comprehensive bibliography, discography, filmography/videography.

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Images of War

By Julene Fischer

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Vietnam - the name that conjured up terror, indecision,and conflict. Here is the book showing us the soldiers and civilians, the dead and the living. Used as a syllabus in many colleges due to its illustrious photos and text.

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Interior Desecrations: Hideous Homes from the Horrible 70's

By James Lileks

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"Warning! This book is not to be used in any way, shape, or form as a design manual. Rather, like the documentary about youth crime 'Scared Straight,' it is meant as a caution of sorts, a warning against any lingering nostalgia we may have for the 1970s, a breathtakingly ugly period when even the rats parted their hair down the middle. (Please note that the author and publisher are not responsible for the results of viewing these pictures.) James Lileks came of age in the 1970s, and for him there was no crueler thing you could inflict upon a person. The music: either sluggish metal, cracker-boogie, or wimpy ballads. Television: camp without the pleasure of knowing it's camp. Politics: the sweaty perfidy of Nixon, the damp uselessness of Ford, the sanctimonious impotence of Carter. The world: nasty. Hair: unspeakable. Architecture: metal-shingled mansard roofs on franchise chicken shops. No oil. No fun. Syphilis and Fonzie.

"Interior Desecrations is the author's revenge on the decade. Using an ungodly collection of the worst of 1970s interior design magazines, books, and pamphlets, he proves without a shadow of a doubt that the '70s were a hideously grim period. This is what happens when Dad drinks, Mom floats in a Valium haze, the kids slump down in the den with a bong, and the decorator is left to run amok. It seemed so normal at the time. But this book should cure whatever lingering nostalgia we have. So adjust your sense of style, color, and taste. beware! You've been warned."

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Meltdown: A Race Against Nuclear Disaster at Three Mile Island: A Reporter's Story

By Wilborn Hampton

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"This riveting eyewitness report--including dramatic photos--takes readers right to the scene of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island. March 28, 1979: It was 4 a.m. at the nuclear power plant on an island in the middle of the Susquehanna River. Suddenly, an alarm shrieked. Something was wrong inside the plant. Within minutes, human error and technical failure triggered the worst nuclear power accident in the United States, and, within hours, the eyes of the world would be on Three Mile Island. Thirty-four years after the bombing of Hiroshima, the crisis at Three Mile Island re-awoke the world to the dangers of nuclear power, and now, in MELTDOWN, Wilborn Hampton tells the hour-by-hour story of covering the accident as a U.P.I. reporter."

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Ms. and the Material Girls: Perceptions of Women from the 1970s through the 1990s

By Catherine Gourley

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Contents:

Prologue: The women's strike for equality, August 26, 1970 -- Who took the "r" out of "Mrs."? -- Bionic women and real-life heroines -- From denial to indulgence : the body obsession -- The material world, or welcome to the 1980s -- Guerrilla girls and other militant females march into the 1990s -- Epilogue: The girl power revolution.

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