Women of Courage

The Journal of Hélène Berr

By David Bellos, translator

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The joyful but ultimately heartbreaking journal of a young Jewish woman in occupied Paris, now published for the first time, 63 years after her death. In 1942, Hélène Berr, a 21-year-old Jewish student at the Sorbonne, started to keep a journal, writing with verve and style about her everyday life in Paris--about her studies, her friends, her growing affection for the "boy with the grey eyes," about the sun in the dewdrops, and about the effect of the growing restrictions imposed by France's Nazi occupiers. Humiliations were to follow, which she records, now with a view to posterity. She wants the journal to go to her fiancé, who has enrolled with the Free French Forces, as she knows she may not live much longer. She was right. The final entry is dated February 15, 1944, and we now know she died in Bergen-Belsen in April 1945, within a month of Anne Frank and just days before the liberation of the camp.

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The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice

By Sandra Day O'Connor

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"Tracing some of the origins of American law through history, people, and ideas, O'Connor sheds new light on the basics, and through personal observation she explores the development of institutions and ideas we have come to regard as fundamental. O'Connor discusses notable cases that have shaped American democracy and the Court as we know it today, and she traces the turbulent battle women have fought for a place in our nation's legal system since America's inception. Straight-talking, clear-eyed, inspiring, The Majesty of the Law is more than a reflection on O'Connor's own experiences as the first female Justice of the Supreme Court; it also contains a discussion of how the suffrage movement changed the lives of women--in voting booths, jury boxes, and homes across the country."

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The Path to Power

By Margaret Thatcher

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In a prequel to The Downing Street Years, Thatcher describes her childhood, Oxford education, early entry into politics, and rise to power in Parliament, sharing insights into the influences that shaped her life and political career.

 

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The Women Who Wrote the War

By Nancy Caldwell Sorel

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Celebrates the accomplishments of World War II's female war correspondents, who risked their lives in combat zones to provide firsthand reports on the events of the war.

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Trailblazer: An Intimate Biography of Sarah Palin

By Lorenzo Benet

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"...the intimate portrait of Sarah Palin that America has been looking for. Beginning with Palin's birth in Sandpoint, Idaho, and her family's move to Skagway and then Wasilla, Alaska, Trailblazer details the difficulties of growing up in Alaska, Sarah Palin's early successes as a basketball star and a beauty pageant contestant, and the story of her elopement with Todd Palin, whom she met at Wasilla High. It describes her career as a broadcast journalist and young mother, and gives details on her move to the political arena that has culminated in making her a household name. From staff firings in Wasilla to her controversies with the Alaska Oil and Gas Commission, from her support of Todd Palin's snow machine races to her own love for moose and caribou hunting and salmon fishing, and culminating with the almost manic excitement of the 2008 election, Lorenzo Benet has built up a detailed picture of a fascinating and extraordinarily complex woman -- an introduction to a Sarah Palin that the world is only just coming to know."

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When Janey Comes Marching Home: Portraits of Women Combat Veterans

By Laura Browder, editor

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"While women are officially barred from combat in the American armed services, in the current war, where there are no front lines, the ban on combat is virtually meaningless. More than in any previous conflict in our history, American women are engaging with the enemy, suffering injuries, and even sacrificing their lives in the line of duty. When Janey Comes Marching Home juxtaposes forty-eight self-posed photographs by Sascha Pflaeging with oral histories collected by Laura Browder to provide a dramatic portrait of women at war. Women from all five branches of the military share their stories here--stories that are by turns moving, comic, thought-provoking, and profound.

"Seeing their faces in stunning color photographic portraits and reading what they have to say about loss, comradeship, conflict, and hard choices will change the ways we think about women and war. Serving in a combat zone is an all-encompassing experience that is transformative, life-defining, and difficult to leave behind. By coming face-to-face with women veterans, we who are outside that world can begin to get a sense of how the long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have their lives and how their stories may ripple out and influence the experiences of all American women."

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Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue

By Kathryn J. Atwood

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These twenty-six suspense-filled stories unfold from across Germany, Poland, Great Britain, the United States, and more, providing an inspiring reminder of women and girls' refusal to sit on the sidelines around the world and throughout history.

Sophie Scholl : the White Rose -- Maria von Maltzan : the countess who hid Jews -- Irene Gut : "only a young girl" -- Irena Sendler : life in a jar -- Stefania Podgorska : the teen who hid thirteen -- Marie-Madeleine Fourcade : "only a woman" -- Andrée Virot : Agent Rose -- Josephine Baker : spy singer -- Magda Trocmé : wife, mother, teacher, rescuer -- Diet Eman : courier for the Dutch resistance -- Hannie Schaft : the symbol of the resistance -- Johtje Vos : a group effort -- Corrie ten Boom : watchmaker, rescuer, reconciler -- Andrée de Jongh : the comet line -- Hortense Daman : partisan courier -- Fernande Keufgens : the teen with the bold voice -- Monica Wichfeld : heroine of the Danish resistance -- Ebba Lund : the girl with the red cap -- Noor Inayat Khan : royal spy -- Nancy Wake : the white mouse -- Pearl Witherington : the courier who became a leader -- Virginia Hall : the greatest American spy -- Muriel Phillips : U.S. Army nurse -- Marlene Dietrich : "the only important thing" -- Maria Gulovich : Slovak for the OSS -- Martha Gellhorn : war correspondent.

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Women in World History: A Biographical Encyclopedia

By Anne Commire, editor

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The work includes women of historical interest from all walks of life and is truly international in scope. Three hundred contributors from 20 nations participated. Among those researched are wives, daughters, mothers, and other women who were not documented in traditional, male-oriented sources, especially history books. Originally, only women deceased before 1926 were to be included, but the scope was later altered to include women of the 1960s feminist era and those "whose places in history are secure." A 16-volume set.

This reference set may be used in the library, and you may Ask a Librarian to check to see if a subject is covered.

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Women's Firsts: Milestones in Women's History

By Peggy Saari and Tim Gall and Susan Gall, editors

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Entries in chronological order present women involved in important moments in the arts, business, social activism, government, religion, sports, and other areas. Presented in 2 volumes. Published in 1998.

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Young Woman and the Sea: How Trudy Ederle Conquered the English Channel and Inspired the World

By Glenn Stout

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In 1926, a plucky American teenager named Trudy Ederle captured the imagination of the world when she became the first woman to swim the English Channel. Stout offers the dramatic and inspiring story of Ederle's pursuit of a goal no one believed possible, and the price she paid.

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