Stories from the Ancients: Native America

The Boy who Lived with the Bears: And Other Iroquois Stories

By Joseph Bruchac (storyteller) and Murv Jacob (illustrator)

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The Parabola Storytime series is a collection of stories and myths by the leading storytellers of Native American tribes. Originally produced by "Parabola" magazine in audio format, many of these stories appear here in written form for the first time, with the permission of tribal elders, and are enhanced by artwork authentic to the tradition. These stories evoke the beauty, wisdom, and living spirit of surviving oral traditions. In these six Iroquois tales, animals showcase the best of human emotions and spirit. Buzzard flies to the Creator to bring back clothes for all the birds. Tiny Chipmunk takes on massive and powerful Bear in a challenge to determine whether or not the sun will keep rising. In the title story, a young boy has lost his human family and finds love in the home of the Bears. Wise and foolish, cowardly and brave animals teach humans how to live better lives, while providing entertainment.
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The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses

By Paul Goble (storyteller and illustrator)

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Goble's Caldecott Medal-winning book tells the story of a young Native American girl who is devoted to the care of her tribe's horses. With simple text and brilliant illustrations, Goble reveals how she eventually becomes one of them to forever run free.
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The Path of the Quiet Elk: A Native American Alphabet Book

By Virginia A. Stroud

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This lyrical alphabet book, drawn from Native American teachings, tells of 26 different ways to remember our interconnectedness with everything on earth. The Path of the Quiet Elk is not a place, but a way of learning to look at life. Each letter from A to Z is illustrated with a nature scene painted by renowned artist Virginia Stroud's distinctive style.
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The Rough-Face Girl

By Rafe Martin and David Shannon (illustrator)

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In an Algonquin village by the shores of Lake Ontario, many young women have tried to win the affections of the powerful Invisible Being who lives with his sister in a great wigwam near the forest. Then comes Rough-Face Girl, scarred from working by the fire. Can she succeed where her beautiful, cruel sisters have failed? This is an Algonquin Indian version of the Cinderella story.
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