Spine-Tinglers!

Edgar Allan Poe

"The Masque of the Red Death." "Cask of Amontillado." "The Tell-Tale Heart." Poe mastered the art of spine-tingling storytelling in the 19th century, and few have come close to rivaling his mastery since. Read these in front of the fire with one candle lit for the full effect.

Charles Dickens

In this special collector's edition, a selection of Charles Dickens's most captivating stories are gathered together, richly illustrated with handwritten manuscript pages, rare family photographs, and a splendid array of prints and drawings from the special collections of The New York Public Library.

Dennis McFarland

After sending their only daughter off to boarding school, Cookson Selway and his wife, Ellen, travel to London to escape their empty house. But their quiet hotel has guests other than those on the register, and the vacation turns into a journey not only to another city but to another time. As Selway is drawn into a series of mysterious encounters with a young girl who died in a fall from his hotel window sixty years earlier, the characters of her life become more real to him than those of his own.

Tim Powers

When Koot Parganas accidently breaks a plaster statue venerated by his parents, he unwittingly unleashes the ghost of Thomas Alva Edison, leading to an alternately terrifying and hilarious adventure in the strange underbelly of contemporary Los Angeles.

Anne Rice

"The time is now.

We are in a small room with the vampire, face to face, as he speaks--as he pours out the hypnotic, shocking, moving, and erotically charged confessions of his first two hundred years as one of the living dead. . ."

Robert Girardi
"Ned Conti is a young historian struggling to piece together the miraculous past of a Brooklyn nun for a tiny stipend, while, at night, he grapples with the paranormal phenomena that have recently seized his rent-controlled apartment: furniture set askew, strange light haunting the bedroom, rocks appearing mysteriously in midair to pummel the floor. His only refuge is the F train and its connection to long Manhattan nights in East Village bars that he visits with his forlorn and eccentric friends. As the summer grows hotter and his apartment more threatening, a baffled but tolerant Ned sets out to uncover the secret behind the angry spirit and, in so doing, is drawn irretrievably into a world of desire and fate...where all around him lingers the dark dream of New Orleans, a place of magical disaster. Ten years before, he fled the Crescent City, never to return, when Antoinette, his true love, ended their brief but urgent affair. Now he's going back, returning to the past that has haunted him for a decade."
Stephen King
A spine-tingling, bizarre collection of tales about sinister forces and unspeakable things that are working the night shift. Read with the lights on!
Harlan Ellison
"A revolutionary classic from one of science fiction's most highly regarded authors, this collection of 16 brilliant stories remains as scathing and influential today as it was when it was first published more than 20 years ago. These category-defying stories combine science fiction, horror, and fantasy with ironic humor, sardonic social criticism, and intense self-revelation.

"From 'Jeffty is Five,' the tragedy of an innocent child wrenched out of an idyllic past, to humanity's encounter with dangerously seductive aliens in 'How's the Night Life on Cissalda?' and 'Shatterday,' the dark allegory of an identity-stealing doppelganger replacing his inferior twin, this incendiary collection re-establishes its legendary author's place at the cutting edge of the short story form."

Caleb Carr

"In The Angel of Darkness, Caleb Carr brings back the vivid world of his bestselling The Alienist but with a twist: this story is told by the former street urchin Stevie Taggert, whose rough life has given him wisdom beyond his years. Thus New York City, and the groundbreaking alienist Dr. Kreizler himself, are seen anew. It is June 1897.

"A year has passed since Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, a pioneer in forensic psychiatry, tracked down the brutal serial killer John Beecham with the help of a team of trusted companions and a revolutionary application of the principles of his discipline. Kreizler and his friends--high-living crime reporter John Schuyler Moore; indomitable, derringer-toting Sara Howard; the brilliant (and bickering) detective brothers Marcus and Lucius Isaacson; powerful and compassionate Cyrus Montrose; and Stevie Taggert, the boy Kreizler saved from a life of street crime--have returned to their former pursuits and tried to forget the horror of the Beecham case.

"But when the distraught wife of a Spanish diplomat begs Sara's aid, the team reunites to help find her kidnapped infant daughter. It is a case fraught with danger, since Spain and the United States are on the verge of war. Their investigation leads the team to a shocking suspect: a woman who appears to the world to be a heroic nurse and a loving mother, but who may in reality be a ruthless murderer of children."

Stephen King

Four stories written by Stephen King under his early psuedonym, Richard Bachman. Includes "Rage," "The Long Walk," "Roadwork," and "The Running Man." These stories are intense, raw, and compelling. Make your own decision about how these rate in King's massive compendium.

Jennifer Justice

"This anthology of audience participation stories is the next in a series of books that began with the publication of Joining In. Jennifer Justice, a marvelous storyteller from Boston, combines her keen editorial ability with her intimate story sense to bring us into the realm of ghostly humor and fright. The Ghost & I features 16 tales by award-winners Joe Bruchac, Rafe Martin, Heather Forest, Laura Simms, Jay OCallahan, and more. The stories, geared for ages 5 14, vary from funny to frightening, and from simple to complex in plot and imagery. Some of the stories invite a great deal of physical participation, while others simply inspire active listening by repetition and anticipation."

Edith Wharton
"One might not expect a woman of Edith Wharton's literary stature to be a believer of ghost stories, much less be frightened by them, but as she admits in her postscript to this spine-tingling collection, '...till I was twenty-seven or -eight, I could not sleep in the room with a book containing a ghost story.' Once her fear was overcome, however, she took to writing tales of the supernatural for publication in the magazines of the day. These eleven finely wrought pieces showcase her mastery of the traditional New England ghost story and her fascination with spirits, hauntings, and other supernatural phenomena. Called "flawlessly eerie" by Ms. magazine, this collection includes 'Pomegranate Seed,' 'The Eyes,' 'All Souls,' 'The Looking Glass,' and 'The Triumph of Night.'"
Ray Bradbury
"The Illustrated Man is classic Bradbury - a collection of tales that breathe and move, animated by sharp, intaken breath and flexing muscle. Here are eighteen startling visions of humankind's destiny, unfolding across a canvas of decorated skin - visions as keen as the tattooist's needle and as colorful as the inks that indelibly stain the body. The images, ideas, sounds and scents that abound in this phantasmagoric sideshow are provocative and powerful: the mournful cries of celestial travelers cast out cruelly into a vast, empty space of stars and blackness...the sight of gray dust selling over a forgotten outpost on a road that leads nowhere...the pungent odor of Jupiter on a returning father's clothing. Here living cities take their vengeance, technology awakens the most primal natural instincts, Martian invasions are foiled by the good life and the glad hand, and dreams are carried aloft in junkyard rockets. Ray Bradbury's The Illustrated Man is a kaleidoscopic blending of magic, imagination, and truth, widely believed to be one of the Grandmaster's premier accomplishments: as exhilarating as interplanetary travel, as maddening as a walk in a million-year rain, and as comforting as simple, familiar rituals on the last night of the world."
Washington Irving
"Paintings as crisp and clear as a Halloween night recreate the chilling tale of the headless horseman galloping through the haunted woods of Sleepy Hollow." Unabridged version!
Stephen King

"This is the way the world ends: with a nanosecond of computer error in a Defense Department laboratory and a million casual contacts that form the links in a chain letter of death.

"And here is the bleak new world of the day after: a world stripped of its institutions and emptied of 99 percent of its people. A world in which a handful of panicky survivors choose sides -- or are chosen. A world in which good rides on the frail shoulders of the 108-year-old Mother Abigail -- and the worst nightmares of evil are embodied in a man with a lethal smile and unspeakable powers: Randall Flagg, the dark man."

Manly Wade Wellman

"This is a fine collection of Wellman's most recent Appalachian tales written in the 70's and 80's. Tales about Judge Pursuivant, John Thunstone, Silver John and others all make appearances."

Trill Coster’s Burden -- The Spring -- Owls Hoot in the Daytime -- Can These Bones Live? -- Nobody Ever Goes There -- Where Did She Wander? -- A Witch For All Seasons (originally by “Gans T Field”) -- The Beasts That Perish -- Willow He Walk -- Chastel -- Rouse Him Not -- Hundred Years Gone -- Keep Me Away -- Yare -- Chorazin -- The Petey Car -- Along About Sundown -- What of the Night -- Dead Man’s Chair (as “Rock Rock”) -- Lamia -- Caretaker -- The Ghastly Priest Doth Reign -- Goodman’s Place --

Dean Koontz

Two genetically engineered creatures escape from a lab. One is an intelligent Golden Retriever. The other is something much more sinister.

Mary Higgins Clark
Here is the novel that established Clark as one of today's most phenomenally successful authors. After a terrible marriage and the tragic deaths of her two children, Nancy changes her name, hair, and residence and finally finds peace--until the nightmare begins again.