Feature Articles - Arts

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 6:01pm

Settlers started moving west as soon as the land by the eastern rivers was claimed.  Wanting the right to expand into more territory was one of the factors in the American Revolution, including anger at the Proclamation of 1763 that restricted further settlement. Indeed, many veterans of the Revolution received land grants in the west for their service.  In the late 1700s to the early 1800s, the West could mean Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and parts of Pennsylvania. As those places filled up, too, and immigrants kept on coming, they eventually spread across the plains and into the heartland.

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 4:51pm
Fabulous Friday: Journey to Freedom

When it comes to sharing history with young people, nothing brings it alive better than a living historian leading activities and offering truly historic objects that can be explored by little hands. This February, observe Black History Month at your library with opportunities to meet living historians from the 23rd Regiment United States Colored Troops, visit a historic one-room school house, or learn about secret code used for the Underground Railroad. These Fabulous Friday: Journey to Freedom events are happening at five of CRRL's library branches.

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 4:46pm
An Interview with the 23rd Regiment United States Colored Troops

The 23rd Regiment was the first African American unit to fight against the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. They met on the battlefield on May 15, 1864, during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. Today’s living history organization, named for the 23rd, is headquartered in the Spotsylvania area and works in conjunction with the John J. Wright Educational & Cultural Center Museum.

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 2:36pm
If you like 11/22/63 by Stephen King

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

11/22/63 by Stephen King: If you had the chance to change the course of history, would you? Would the consequences be what you hoped? Jake Epping, 35, teaches high school English in Lisbon Falls, Maine, and cries reading the brain-damaged janitor's story of a childhood Halloween massacre by their drunken father. On his deathbed, pal Al divulges a secret portal to 1958 in his diner back pantry, and enlists Jake to prevent the 11/22/1963 Dallas assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Under the alias George Amberson, our hero joins the cigarette-hazed full-flavored world of Elvis rock'n'roll, racial discrimination, and freeway gas-guzzlers without seat belts. Will Jake lurk in impoverished immigrant slums beside troubled loner Lee Harvey Oswald, or share small-town friendliness with beautiful high school librarian Sadie Dunhill, the love of his life?

If you like  11/22/63, you may also enjoy these titles:

Doomsday Book by Connie Willis

For Kivrin, preparing an on-site study of one of the deadliest eras in humanity's history was as simple as receiving inoculations against the diseases of the fourteenth century and inventing an alibi for a woman traveling alone. For her instructors in the twenty-first century, it meant painstaking calculations and careful monitoring of the rendezvous location where Kivrin would be received.  (catalog description)

Flashforward by Robert J. Sawyer

A science experiment goes wrong, giving everyone a glimpse of the future. One man learns a rival will steal his wife, another that he will win a lottery, a third that he will be murdered and has 20 years to find the killer. A look at the repercussions of knowing the future.  (catalog description)

Fri, 02/05/2016 - 8:53am
Kate Waller Barrett

Kate Waller Barrett (1857-1925), gently raised daughter of a prominent Stafford County family, was confronted as a young woman by a heart-wrenching scene that played out before her in her home. It stirred her heart and propelled her into a public life. The humanitarian work inspired by Kate Waller Barrett’s experience led eventually to established shelters and services across this country and abroad known generally as the Florence Crittenton Mission.

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 1:07pm
Bad Monkeys from A World Run by Secrets booklist

Whether we belong to a tribe comprised of harried moms, college students, or even librarians, we recognize our "kindred spirits" by dress, behavior, and other things we have in common.  

But have you ever wondered about secret societies? Ones where members recognize each other by a secret handshake or door knock or even a cryptic eyebrow quirk. Maybe secret societies possess ancient wisdom that they will share with the world when the time is right. 

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 1:04pm
Eve and Adam from Love at First Line booklist

Many people don’t think about this, but books have pick-up lines. Just like those people in school, online, or anywhere else where people are looking for love. With a book, sometimes all it takes is that first line to get a reader hooked. Sometimes, it’s the first few few lines, but those are still pick-up lines. After all, many times the pick-up lines you hear from interested humans are not one sentence.

Thu, 02/04/2016 - 11:33am
Photo of Kindle Touch

You may have noticed that eBooks and eReaders are catching on with people.  With reports of ridiculously large sales numbers around the holidays, such as the one million Kindles sold each week of the 2011 holiday season, one gets the feeling that these gadgets might just have some staying power. 

At the Central Rappahannock Regional Library we have been delighted to offer the public free eBooks to check out through services like EBSCOhost and OverDrive. 

Overall, the public seems to be equally delighted with the service as our circulation statistics for eBooks continues to climb.
 

EBooks from the library have a number of advantages:eReaders - Kindle, iPad, smartphone

  • No late fees, period!
    Now, we have heard from numerous patrons that eBooks they check out will, through one technical hiccup or another, remain on their devices past the check-out period and concerns have been raised that overdue fees will be assessed because of this.  Have no fear: if you’ve experienced this difficulty, it does not change the fact that your eBook is indeed available for other patrons to check out, and you will not be fined one cent.
     
  • 24-hour service: our digital offerings are available for you to check out any time, any day, regardless of whether the library is open.  You want to read a Sookie Stackhouse book at 2 AM on a Sunday morning?  You can do that on OverDrive! Or, maybe you’re working at the last minute on a big paper for school and you need some serious non-fiction to help your research, but the library is closed.  Well, head over to EBSCOhost; with book titles as diverse as “Higher Education and Democracy: Essays on Service-learning and Civic Engagement” and “Entangled Geographies: Empire and Technopolitics in the Global Cold War,” I’m pretty sure EBSCOhost has your back when it comes to research.

    (Photo of eReaders by The Daring Librarian)
     
  • There are practically no limits on your checkouts. 
    Now, I do say practically.  Technically, OverDrive limits you to seven checkouts at a time, but you can return your books quite easily to free up space in your checkout queue for another title. This can be done through the Amazon.com if you checked the book out on a Kindle, through Adobe Digital Editions if you’re reading it on a Nook or Sony, or through the OverDrive Media Console app if you’re using a tablet computer.  And while EBSCOhost does not yet allow books to be returned early, you can have up to fifty titles checked out at once; we hope that will be enough.
     

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