Feature Articles - Arts

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 2:32pm
Books to Go... With Local Libations, Eateries, Markets, & More

BOSS:  Hey, can you create a booklist to highlight downtown Fredericksburg, maybe for Restaurant Week?

ME: <out loud> Sure, that would be FUN!  <to myself> Are you kidding?  What kind of booklist could I do for that? What’s my hook? There is no hook.  Nooooooo. I’m doomed!  Doomed!  I’m gonna need a snack to figure this out.  There are no snacks here.  What snacks do I have at home? Wait. Wait. I’m getting an idea….

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 1:33pm
Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster by Jon Krakauer: "A bank of clouds was assembling on the not-so-distant horizon, but journalist-mountaineer Jon Krakauer, standing on the summit of Mt. Everest, saw nothing that 'suggested that a murderous storm was bearing down.' He was wrong. The storm, which claimed five lives and left countless more--including Krakauer's--in guilt-ridden disarray, would also provide the impetus for Into Thin Air, Krakauer's epic account of the May 1996 disaster." (Book Summary)

If you like nonfiction accounts of survival like Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. Everest Disaster, then you may also like these titles:

Adrift: Seventy-six days lost at sea by Steven Callahan
The author recalls his seventy-six day ordeal adrift in the Atlantic Ocean in a five foot inflatable raft, after the sinking of his sailboat, recounting his problems surviving the weather, shark attacks, raft leaks, and food and water shortages.
 

Alive: The story of the Andes survivors by Piers Paul Read
On October 12, 1972, a plane carrying a team of young rugby players crashed into the remote, snow-peaked Andes. Out of the forty-five original passengers and crew, only sixteen made it off the mountain alive. For ten excruciating weeks they suffered deprivations beyond imagining, confronting nature head-on at its most furious and inhospitable. And to survive, they were forced to do what would have once been unthinkable ... This is their story -- one of the most astonishing true adventures of the twentieth century. (amazon.com)

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 12:55pm
My Librarian: Your Personal Reading Advisor

Connecting you, the reader, to your personally perfect books is a passion for CRRL librarians. It’s a skill for which we are trained and an art in which we take oh-so-much pleasure. We try to read in many genres and across many disciplines to better help readers find what they need. That’s the body of professional knowledge on which we draw.  

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 12:35pm

Grow a Reader classes | Community Events | Fast Facts About the Early Years | Links of Interest

Children need a strong early learning foundation to succeed in school and life.  We are proud to partner with local organizations to bring attention to this issue of vital importance to our community.  

Did you know?

  • Children exposed to books early in life have better language skills than those who wait?

  • 90% percent of a child’s brain is developed before reaching kindergarten?

  • The seeds of a desirable workforce skills-critical thinking, teamwork, effective communication - are planted before the age of five?

What can you do? Bring your children and spread the word about the library’s Grow a Reader classes. Each class is presented by specially trained staff who share stories, songs and activities that lay the foundation your child needs to get ready to read.

  • Visit your local library regularly to check out titles even your baby is sure to enjoy!

  • Read to your child daily and keep it fun! Stop reading as soon as they show you they’re done.

  • Reach out and thank parents, teachers, and all adults who help young children get a great start!

 

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 11:08am
Cover to All the Clean Ones Are Married

I don’t have a passport. I should have a passport. I need a passport. I want to be the type of person who can jet off to Paris on a moment’s notice. The type of person who is asked to jet off to Paris on a moment’s notice. I’ve printed out many passport applications.

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 10:55am
Cover to Thyme of Death

They say that with age comes wisdom. I’m not so sure—most middle-aged ladies I know (myself included!) seem to not be able to remember anything! Maybe the phrase means the wisdom to say “now, honey, you’re gonna hafta remind me of this conversation, because I surely will forget everything momentarily!”

Now that I have become, ahem, une femme d’un certain âge, I find that I am drawn to mysteries with little old lady sleuths.

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 9:43am
The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling

Steampunk is a genre that imagines what would happen in a society where technology is powered by steam instead of electricity. Many steampunk novels grapple with our fear of technology and explore what technology can do to us or make us do.  

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 9:25am
Making Family Mealtimes Easier

I spend a couple of hours most days preparing, cooking, serving, and cleaning up after meals for my family of six. On the weekends, my husband and I try to spend a few hours each Sunday prepping our meals for the week, which makes life run much easier during the time-crunched weeknights. I would love to be able to say that I am a natural chef, whose talents are just waiting to be set free when I have a little more time...or when I find the perfect cookbook. But since a few members of my family are chefs who can really cook, I’ve faced the fact that I can barely hold my own in the kitchen.

Here are some things that I have discovered through the past 17 years of cooking for kids, though, that have made life easier:

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 9:17am
Cover to Inherent Vice

First, a confession: Thomas Pynchon fans are worse than Jane Austen fans, always proselytizing in the hope of capturing new readers. I hoped the recent success of a film version of Pynchon’s Inherent Vice would bring requests for his work. They did not materialize, which is a shame, as the book is more accessible than some of his other works to the general reader and deserves a broader readership.

His reputation for weirdness, paranoia, and postmodern tricks scares some people: too much work in the reading. All because of one novel.

Fri, 03/27/2015 - 9:00am
Finding Spiritual Strength: Biographies of Great Christian Men and Women

Have you been inspired by a great man or woman? Perhaps it was a political figure or leader you saw on TV, a humanitarian featured on the cover of a magazine, or a CEO in the Wall Street Journal. Most of us have found someone to admire at one time or another. While I have been intrigued by many people in the news, I usually turn to biographies for any in-depth understanding of great people. Poets, kings and queens, theologians, statesmen, artists, and authors—I don’t shy away from any type of person.

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