Holiday Closing: All branches will be closed starting at 5:00 pm Wednesday, Nov. 25 and continuing Thursday, Nov. 26 and Friday, Nov. 27 for the Thanksgiving holiday.

African American

Fri, 10/30/2015 - 8:46am

Listen and watch a video of Kadir Nelson and you will get to know one of the most wonderful children’s book illustrators of our time. The soft-spoken Nelson has accomplished, before the age of 30, many things. He has worked on a Stephen Spielberg film, Amistad, and won the Caldecott Honor Award for Illustration for Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led her People to Freedom, in 2007 and in 2008, won it again for Henry’s Freedom Box: a True Story from the Underground Railroad.

Born in Washington, D.C, Kadir began drawing at the age of 3 and at the age of 12 was apprenticed to his uncle, an artist and art instructor himself. Nelson won many contests and ultimately won a scholarship to and attended the Pratt Institute of Art in Brooklyn, New York. He currently lives and works in San Diego, California.

Nelson has a passion for African Americans and their plight and has illustrated beautifully many books and has created many works of art for celebrities that have sought him out.

Wed, 07/22/2015 - 5:16pm
When the Beat Was Born by Laban Carrick Hill and Illustrated by Theodore Taylor

When the Beat Was Born, by Laban Carrick Hill, is a stunning example of just how wonderfully diverse the world of children's biographies is getting. This picture book offers a look into the life of DJ Kool Herc, one of the founders and innovators of hip-hop music.

Hill's words, when combined with Theodore Taylor III's crisp, colorful illustrations, depict how a boy named Clive left Kingston, Jamaica, for the Bronx. Clive wanted to be a DJ, slinging an arsenal of records and getting crowds amped up at parties.

Mon, 01/05/2015 - 2:03pm

To open a book illustrated by Floyd Cooper is to be drawn into a world of warmth, bravery, and joy. His drawings are as essential as the text itself in illuminating the world of childhood, often of the Black experience.

He was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1956. Early on, his family lived in the projects and had little money, but his mother was able to give him a sense of self-worth that he has carried with him always. She also shared stories with him, helping to build his imagination.

Tue, 11/11/2014 - 2:12pm

What was it like to live long ago when Virginia belonged to England? When there were no cars, no computers, few hospitals and no free public schools?

Without cars, trains or airplanes, people traveled by boat, horseback or on foot by "shank's mare". The reason so many colonial towns were located next to rivers is that often the roads were terrible seas of mud. It was so much easier to travel on the rivers!

Thu, 11/06/2014 - 12:10pm
Kwanzaa, celebrated between December 26 and January 1, is a time for families in the African-American community to come together and enjoy their heritage. Unlike many holidays, Kwanzaa was created by one person, Maulana Karenga, in 1966. He named the celebration Kwanzaa, which means "first fruits" in Swahili.

Tue, 08/12/2014 - 8:56am

By the Spotsylvania Department of Tourism

From The Start ...

Blacks first arrived in isolated and sparsely populated Spotsylvania County along with white settlers in the early 1700's. Through the years before the Civil War, as slaves and occasionally as free men and women, they were an important force in area development. Occupations included labor as farm and plantation workers, as domestic servants, and as artisans, such as blacksmiths, carpenters, coopers, and fine needleworkers. They also worked in the iron industries, mining, construction, shipping on the Rappahannock River, and in their own businesses.

By the first half of the 19th century, Spotsylvania County's population reached about 11,000, over half of whom were black.
Alex Haley's award winning novel, Roots, cast his African ancestor, Kunta Kinte, as a slave of a Spotsylvania family.

Wed, 02/05/2014 - 2:42pm
Generation Dream 2014 Concert

The Generation Dream 2014 Concert has been a much-anticipated annual event for the last eight years in Richmond, and now CRRL is pleased to bring this concert to Fredericksburg for the first time ever! The Generation Dream concerts honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. They include live performances that range from a rock band to a classical trio, rap musicians, modern dance, traditional African dance and even to spoken word artists. You can learn more by visiting them on Facebook.

The Fredericksburg concert will be held on Sunday, February 16, from 3:00-4:30 at the Headquarters Library Theater on 1201 Caroline Street. It is sponsored by the Richmond Youth Peace Project, a program of the Richmond Peace Education Center. To sign up, please call 540-372-1144. 

Mon, 09/30/2013 - 12:02pm

Faith Ringgold is an artist who uses different materials to tell the stories that are important to her family and her people. Whether working with quilting squares, African masks, paint and brush, or her own words, Faith gives the rich colors and textures a life of their own. There's motion in her work, a striving upward and pushing at the edges of her world.

Tue, 02/12/2013 - 1:34pm

In 1939, talented singer Marian Anderson was denied the spotlight at the D.A.R.'s Constitution Hall on account of her race. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt quickly saw to it that she had another venue--the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. On Easter Sunday, a crowd of 75,000 listened to her in person, and her music was carried on the radio and heard by many more. After the concert, Marian Anderson went on to break more racial barriers in the entertainment industry and became a voice of the Civil Rights Movement.

Mon, 07/16/2012 - 1:56pm
Eugene Williams

This interview airs beginning July 18.
Eugene Williams, Jr., is a writer, poet, singer, professional actor, and teacher with a strong message for black youth. His energy and enthusiasm are unbounded.  He joins Debby Klein on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.