Fredericksburg (Va.)

Tue, 12/06/2016 - 10:40am

From a Scottish port to colonial Fredericksburg to the royal courts of France and Russia, the little man who famously refused to give up the fight was perfectly at home in both cottages and elegant salons, but he was always eager to set sail for adventure and glory.

Wed, 11/09/2016 - 9:20am
Cover to Washington's Monument

The Washington Monument’s starkly simple design and imposing presence on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., both belies the complex machinations that led to its construction and embodies the singularity of George Washington, in whose honor it was erected.

Tue, 11/01/2016 - 7:05am
CRRL Guest Picks: Kickshaw's Kathy Craddock

"I certainly never imagined that when I opened Nourishing Traditions at our local library almost nine years ago that in less than a decade I would open the doors to a natural foods store, but I am certainly glad that I did."  — Kathy Craddock, owner of Kickshaws Downtown and Kickshaws Kitchen

Kathy lives in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, with her husband, two kids, chickens and three dogs. She and her husband, Richard, own Kickshaws Downtown Market and Kickshaws Kitchen in downtown Fredericksburg, focusing on local, organic products and foods for special dietary needs. Here, she shares her thoughts on some of her favorite books:

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 12:50pm
Robert A. Kishpaugh: Making Local History

The recent placement of Fredericksburg on Entrepreneur Magazine’s list of “The Fifty Best Cities for Entrepreneurs” would have come as no surprise to businessman and longtime resident of 1201 Prince Edward St. Robert A. Kishpaugh, who owned and operated a thriving local printing and stationery shop throughout the first half of the twentieth century.

Sat, 10/01/2016 - 3:30pm

By Fredericksburg Area Tourism Department

The spirit of the past still lives in Fredericksburg, Virginia. George Washington's footsteps seem to echo on the paths and streets of his hometown. The voices of Thomas Jefferson and other colonial leaders seem to resound through the Rising Sun Tavern.

Thu, 09/22/2016 - 3:19pm

By Ruth Fitzgerald*
 
Introduction:

Blacks first inhabited Virginia in 1619. They came to the sparsely settled Rappahannock Valley long before Fredericksburg was officially founded in 1728.

In colonial times, Fredericksburg and Falmouth, across the Rappahannock River in Stafford County, were important centers of trade. The towns were considered the gateway to the mountains and the way west, and they also served as major seaports.

Thu, 09/22/2016 - 1:40pm
Accessing the Old Newspapers of Fredericksburg

There have been newspapers published in Fredericksburg since 1788. (The only gap came in 1862-65, when the city was devastated by war.)  Fredericksburg has been a one-newspaper town – the Free Lance-Star –- since the 1920s, but before that many newspapers were published locally….

 

Mon, 09/12/2016 - 8:43am

With Google's now infamous detailed photos, it's rather easy to see how a town is laid out today. But what about 50, 100, or 150 years ago? Where are the maps that show how the towns and counties grew through the years? One excellent source of information is the Sanborn fire insurance maps.

Thu, 09/08/2016 - 10:56am

What was it like to live long ago when Virginia belonged to England? When there were no cars, no computers, few hospitals and no free public schools?

Without cars, trains or airplanes, people traveled by boat, horseback or on foot by "shank's mare". The reason so many colonial towns were located next to rivers is that often the roads were terrible seas of mud. It was so much easier to travel on the rivers!

Tue, 08/30/2016 - 12:08am
Cover to The Circle Unbroken: Civil War Letters of the Knox Family of Fredericksburg

In antebellum Fredericksburg, the Knox family was rather well-off and respected by their community. The family home at 1200 Princess Anne Street, now the Kenmore Inn, was nigh unto their house of worship at St. George’s Episcopal Church. They ran a successful business and had a pleasant life filled with many luxuries.

Yet by the time the Civil War was over, sons Robert and James Knox had experienced the dire consequences of battle from trench to prison camp. The rest of the family, forced to evacuate the Fredericksburg several times, learned to live as refugees and take care of themselves as well as the people they met.

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