20th century

Tue, 11/25/2014 - 8:54am
This House of Sky: Landscapes of a Western Mind by Ivan Doig

Ivan Doig’s This House of Sky is a memoir set in the rugged, sheep-raising terrain of Montana. It was a time when the last of the small-town ranchers were on their way out, pushed along by the Great Depression and rich men buying up failed farms to add to their own.

The author’s people were not of the rich kind. They were scrappy, immigrant stock. Ivan’s grandfather came with family from Scotland. They ran sheep til their luck ran out. Then they worked for the big ranchers.  Ivan’s father was a little guy, but he broke broncos—sometimes breaking his own bones doing it -- rode herd on sheep, bossed the other hands, and fell in love with a 16-year-old girl.

Fri, 06/20/2014 - 10:59am
Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell

Josephine Baker was an African-American singer, dancer, actor, and political activist who rose to prominence in the 1920s. In the book Josephine, written by Patricia Hruby Powell and illustrated by Christian Robinson, her astonishing life is recounted with powerful text as well as enthralling images. Her story is one of struggle, perseverance, and resilience. Her strength of character and fortitude helped her navigate the precarious pathways of life more than once.  

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 1:38pm
Vertigo movie poster

Come join the England Run branch of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library for Alfred Hitchcock's classic 1958 thriller Vertigo starring James Stewart and Kim Novak on Thursday, August 11th at 2:00pm.

A San Francisco detective suffering from acrophobia investigates the strange activities of an old friend's wife, all the while becoming dangerously obsessed with her.

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 1:35pm
Singin' in the Rain

Come join the England Run Branch for the monthly film series Classics in the Afternoon that celebrates the great pictures from the Golden Age of Hollywood! 

On Thursday, May 12th at 2pm come see the Singin' Swingin' Glorious Feelin' Technicolor Musical about the difficulty of transitioning away from the silent screen and onto the silver screen, Singin' in the Rain (1952) starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Conner, and Debbie Reynolds.

Thu, 04/03/2014 - 1:30pm

Come join the Rappahannock Film Club and the Central Rappahannock Regional Library as we present the classic comedy film My Man Godfrey at the Headquarter's Library on Saturday, October 2nd at 2:00 pm.

A high-society scavenger hunt leads to levity when scatterbrained socialite Irene Bullock (Carole Lombard)
stumbles upon an erudite vagabond named Godfrey (William Powell) living in the city dump.

Wed, 03/12/2014 - 8:02am
Scooby-do

From the mid-1950s to the late 1980s, the world of animation in the United States experienced a severe quality drought. Television animation was cheaply and quickly produced and loaded with errors. Feature-length animation experienced severe budget cuts, and the number of animated movies being released was drastically reduced. Cartoons that many generations grew up watching were made with “limited animation”—a style that utilized as few frames as possible, which resulted in choppy, simplified character motions.

Mon, 02/24/2014 - 4:20pm

In 1916, Gari Melchers, an internationally famous painter, purchased the Belmont estate in Falmouth, Virginia. With the exception of some European travel in the 1920s, he made this his permanent home during the last decades of his life. Area residents and visitors are privileged to be able to visit this gem of a museum which combines a glimpse of the artist's home life as well as a tour of his studio.

Wed, 02/19/2014 - 9:10pm
Samuel Pierpont Langley

1903 was a banner year for aircraft development, and Stafford County was on the bleeding edge of it. On December 17, Orville and Wilbur Wright had the first successful manned flight of a mechanical, heavier-than-air machine at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. But two months before that, on October 7, Samuel Pierpont Langley—with the blessings of Smithsonian—launched his design at Widewater in Stafford County. The only problem was, the well-funded flight crashed, dooming Langley’s dreams of being first in flight.

Wed, 02/12/2014 - 1:49pm
Stafford's Coal Landing: Center of Commerce

By 1900 the forests had recovered sufficiently from the ravages of the Civil War to support a lumber business again. Long boats sailed from Coal Landing to Aquia Creek, up the Potomac and on to Baltimore.

Between 1890 and World War I, wood provided one of the few available cash incomes in Stafford. The locals would cut what timber they could and haul it to Coal Landing by wagon or boat to sell for pulpwood. The stacks of logs waiting at the docks were often forty feet high. Because the docks at Coal Landing were fairly extensive, there were a number of fishing boats that worked out of here, also.

Fri, 02/07/2014 - 1:13pm
Gold in Stafford County

Gold was discovered in Stafford during the eighteenth century. In 1787 Thomas Jefferson wrote in his Notes on Virginia, “I know a single instance of gold found in this state. It was interspersed in small specks through a lump of ore, of about four pounds in weight, which yielded seventeen pennyweight [1/20 ounce] of gold, of extraordinary ductility.” This gold was found in Stafford about four miles below Fredericksburg on the north side of the Rappahannock.

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