20th century

Fri, 07/02/2010 - 10:38am

One of the sub-genres that defined classic American crime and detective movies was film noir, a style that was pervasive in detective films of the 1940s and 1950s. Film noir arose during the post-World War II period in the United States as a generation that fought in one of the most brutal conflicts the world had ever seen returned home to a changed America where jobs were scarce and the national mood seemed darker and more cynical than during the war itself. 

Fri, 06/25/2010 - 3:26pm

Come join the Central Rappahannock Regional Library as we present Beach Blanket Bingo, the first film in the Sun and Sand film Series at the Headquarters Library on Saturday, June 26th at 2:00 pm.

Fri, 04/02/2010 - 10:35am

 Fredericksburg bridge toll token with cost given of eight centsSince the body of water known as the Rappahannock River separated two important areas of commerce and trade, it had, of course, to be crossed constantly. The Indians had their canoes and the early settlers had their boats and ferries. The first bridge was built about 1800 and was referred to as Scott's Bridge.

Mac
Fri, 03/19/2010 - 10:49am

Long before Lassie became a famous film star there was another collie who was courted by movie directors. This remarkable "dog with a human brain" had his day in a Fredericksburg court room and escaped the death penalty.

Thu, 02/25/2010 - 3:32pm

Twentieth-century illustrator Norman Rockwell reflected in his work much of what was good in America. He is known for his sweet depictions of small-town life—soda fountains, family scenes, Boy Scouts, town meetings, doctors’ offices, and boys with dogs—but one of his most touching images was a painful one from the Civil Rights Era: “The Problem We All Live With.”

Fri, 02/12/2010 - 9:19am

For more than a decade, she was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, and "Iron Maggie" Thatcher promoted a conservative agenda that focused on deregulation and anti-union policies.

Wed, 02/03/2010 - 8:55am

Born a slave in Franklin County, Virginia, Booker T. (Taliaferro) Washington went on to become a nationally-known leader and educator. He shared his educational philosophy with U.S. presidents and served as the first president of Tuskegee Institute, now Tuskegee University.

Mon, 01/11/2010 - 9:15am

Robert Hodge reported in 1981 that this is from a report prepared by a students of Germanna Community College in circa 1979. Report is not verified and was unsigned. Indeed, there is a variation in the name Bumbrey - represented as Bumbray here, but there are stones with Bumbrey in the cemetery. The original list was accompanied by the following statements:

"The following list of names is a list of people buried in an all black cemetery in the City of Fredericksburg at the corner of Monument Avenue and Littlepage Street.

Thu, 11/12/2009 - 3:27pm

Seems as though every time there is an incident like the recent tragedy at Fort Hood, Clint Van Zandt turns up on TV, offering insight into what has happened and how to understand it. Van Zandt is well known for having been, for many years an FBI major crimes analyst, “profiler” and hostage negotiator. You may not know that he is today the president of a local business, Van Zandt Associates – an international risk and threat management consulting firm.

Wed, 11/04/2009 - 5:09pm

By Sue Willis, CRRL Staff

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Coping with Jim Crow: Black Education in Fredericksburg by Constance Greer O'Brion.
Education and segregation in Fredericksburg from the 40's to the 70's.

A Different Story: A Black History of Fredericksburg, Stafford, and Spotsylvania, Virginia by Ruth Coder Fitzgerald.
Ms. Fitzgerald traces the area's black history from the colonial days to the 1970s. Includes photos of community leaders, past and present. Of particular interest are the following chapters: Moving into the Mainstream by the Reverend Lawrence Davies and "Let Him Speak" by Dr. Philip Y. Wyatt.

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