Families

09/03/2009 - 9:47am

"One of the most important things is to laugh with your children and to let them see you think they're being funny when they're trying to be. It gives children enormous pleasure to think they've made you laugh. They feel they've reached one of the nicest parts in you.... As a picture book artist, I don't think one can be too much on the side of the child."

Helen Oxenbury, from Ways of Telling: Conversations on the Art of the Picture Book, by Leonard S. Marcus.

Helen Oxenbury understands babies. She knows that they are messy, cranky, and wonderful. She knows that few things fascinate a baby like, well, another baby. In the world of board books, those sturdy first books that are impervious to drool and can survive a few tasty chews, Helen Oxenbury reigns supreme.

09/03/2009 - 9:48am

When Betsy Cromer was a young girl, someday being a famous author never crossed her mind. To her way of thinking, book writers led dull lives, shut away in some quiet room without company, just typing and typing. There was no way she wanted to live that kind of life. Yet years later, Betsy has written dozens of books. Unlike the authors she imagined, Betsy's ability to understand and work with people was absolutely essential to making her books a success.

09/03/2009 - 10:33am

When she was a very young woman, Eloise asked her grandma to tell her stories about growing up in the countryside of North Carolina. Eloise was born there, too—in a little place called Parmele. In her grandparents' day, the Parmele lumber mill provided lots of work for people. But with the trees gone and the mill just a memory, the mostly black families who lived there got by as best they could.

12/07/2010 - 1:54pm

This week’s column was supposed to be about great summer reads.  But after the lightning strike that killed a twelve-year-old boy and critically injured his friend last week in Spotsylvania, our community’s attention has turned to grieving families and friends.   

09/10/2009 - 4:06pm

The long, lazy days of summer aren't quite over, and in Virginia, picnic weather continues through most of the fall, to include tailgate season. The library's shelves are brimming with cookbooks of all kinds to suit most every taste. Come browse our shelves, and try out some new recipes for your next friendly get-together in the sweet sunshine.

09/10/2009 - 4:03pm

Good health, enough wealth, long life, happy families—the stuff that dreams are made of. But most Americans' lives fall short in one or more of these areas, and often it's the midlife years (40s to 50s) where things start to go haywire. If you're one of the many, many people who feel that just when they got the hang of the game, the rules completely changed, read on.

 

Work, Retirement, and Financial Planning

What's different about money management at midlife?

05/07/2009 - 3:25pm
After Hours Storytimes

Most library programs for preschoolers take place on weekday mornings.  But if you or your spouse is at work then, how can you bring your child to storytimes?

09/03/2009 - 11:25am

When we were expecting our first child, I started talking with my wife about homeschooling—which I now prefer to call unschooling. She agreed, and we have never regretted it. Raised to be independent learners, both children did well on their college entrance exams and are now away at college.

Working at home, I was able to help with our children's unschooling. I read to them—I am eternally grateful for the public library—and played with them. We sang, danced, built a house, hunted for turtles, crayfish, mushrooms, and learned to keep honeybees together.

07/02/2010 - 10:26am

Divorce touches so many families in the Central Rappahannock Region. But there is help! There are many resources available to assist people contemplating or confronting the sad reality of divorce. Here are a few suggestions:

I. Some Good Books

03/04/2010 - 3:41pm

Autism is a spectrum disorder, meaning that its symptoms range from mild to severe and vary by individual. An autistic child might appear to be largely oblivious to his surroundings, violently overwhelmed by physical sensations, or he might seem outwardly to be simply socially awkward.

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