History Blog

Fri, 07/02/2010 - 11:50am

CRRL History is pleased to announce a new history resource, Virginia History for Kids.  This set of selected books is targeted for children and includes such popular topics as the founding fathers, women's history, frontier life, spies, the American Revolution, colonial life, slavery, the Civil War, and even pirates!  The list lets you choose topics that interest you and see books the library has to check out. 
Put a book on hold by clicking the 'Reserve this title' link.  You can take a look at this new resource here

Wed, 06/23/2010 - 3:52pm

From a Scottish port to colonial Fredericksburg to the royal courts of France and Russia, the little man who famously refused to give up the fight was perfectly at home in both cottages and elegant salons, but he was always eager to set sail for adventure and glory.

Tue, 06/22/2010 - 2:59pm

Between April and September 1862, an estimated 10,000 slaves fled the South through our region. As part of the local Civil War Sesquicentennial commemorations, the Trail to Freedom project was designed to give the public a better understanding of the experiences of those whom the war impacted greatly but are often only a footnote in history books.

Thu, 06/03/2010 - 5:10pm

The time was sunset on Sept. 23, 1779. A full moon was rising. The place was the bloody deck of John Paul Jones’ ship the Bon Homme Richard. There a young Spotsylvanian named Laurence Brooke would show the stuff of which heroes are made.  At age 21, he was the lone surgeon on the Bon Homme Richard as it engaged the 50-gun HMS Serapis in the North Sea off Scarborough, England. The burning Serapis surrendered after a 3 1/2-hour battle during which John Paul Jones proclaimed: “I have not yet begun to fight!”

Thu, 06/03/2010 - 9:45am

Fredericksburg port record information, collected by historian John "Jack" Johnson, is now available for searching and browsing through the CRRL history Web site.

Discover ships and captains making port in this bustling sea town or conduct a general search to get an idea of the commercial activity. For instance, on Christmas Day, 1816, a half dozen ships made port from as far away as Boston, Massachusetts, and as close as Richmond, Virginia, bringing undisclosed cargoes!

Searching the port records can be done by year, ship name, captain name, OR combinations thereof.

Mon, 06/21/2010 - 10:38am

Did you read a really good book a few months ago, but can't remember what it was? Or maybe it was a DVD, audiobook, or magazine?

Now you can keep track of the items you borrow with "My Borrowing History," a new optional service from the CRRL.

How does it work? Easy!

Mon, 04/12/2010 - 10:48am

Gale/Cengage Learning, the publisher of the following databases, is offering library visitors free access during National Library Week:

Career Transitions — a new electronic resource offering a comprehensive guide to career change

Global Issues in Context — this online resource offers global news and perspectives on issues and events of international importance

GREENR (Global Reference on the Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources) — a new electronic resource offering authoritative reference content on the environment, energy, economic development and natural resources

Grzimek’s Animal Life — an interactive, media-rich online resource, with information on more than 4,000 species

Archives Unbound — a vast new resource of topically-focused, cross-searchable digital collections of historical documents

Check them out and contact us if you would like to see any added to the CRRL database collection.

Wed, 03/31/2010 - 11:06am

On Tuesday, April 6, 2010, Paul Israel of Rugters University and author of Edison: A Life of Invention will give a talk on the inventor. This lecture, part of the university's Great Lives series, is free and open to the public. For more information on "The Wizard of Menlo Park," check out this list of materials recommended by the reference staff of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.

Mon, 03/29/2010 - 11:48am

Norman Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter poster encouraged women to roll up their sleeves and get on the job in factories to make munitions and equipment to supply American troops in World War II.

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