LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
Wed, 07/22/2015 - 4:16pm
Ghetto Cowboy by G. Neri

Cole's on the wrong track. He's been skipping school and hanging out with the wrong crowd. Mom has had it with him. So she packs his things in the car and takes him from Detroit to Philadelphia where his dad lives.

Ghetto Cowboy, by G. Neri, is based on a true story of horse raising that does actually occur in North Philadelphia. Cole has never met his dad and his mom isn't thrilled with bringing him back into their lives, but it's her last option.

"He's different is all, but maybe different is what you need."

Mon, 07/16/2012 - 5:17pm
windows 8 logo

I know a lot of us are still getting used to Windows 7, having only recently upgraded or purchased a new computer with it preinstalled.  But guess what?  Windows “8” is right around the corner, and you can try it for yourself today by visiting  Microsoft has released a free preview version of Windows 8 to the public that, on the whole, will be largely the same as the full release, minus some bugs that will be ironed out between

Fri, 04/27/2012 - 3:31am
Cultivating Community: Grand Opening of the Porter Branch Community Garden

April showers bring summer vegetables! Join us this Saturday for the grand opening of our community garden.

The Porter Branch community garden will be a demonstration garden for the community and produce will go to SERVE.  Join us to learn more about local farming and how easy it is to grow a little or a lot of your own food. 

Watch the garden's progress on our Tumblr site:

Activities include:

  • A special story time and movie will be presented and children can pot a plant to take home.
  • Jeff and Ginny Adams of Walnut Hill Farm will have a table and information about local farming.
  • North Stafford High School Horticulture Program will have plants for sale
  • Free packets of seeds, both vegetable and flower, will be available compliments of the North Stafford County-Garrisonville Rotary Club
  • The Master Gardeners will answer your gardening questions
  • The Master Naturalists will have an information table

This is just one way the library is Cultivating Community in 2012:

Fri, 05/16/2014 - 2:20pm
Seeing Cinderella by Jenny Lundquist

What would you do if you discovered that you could read other people’s thoughts?

It’s not bad enough that Callie Anderson has to get glasses just before the start of middle school, but they are the ugliest glasses she has ever seen. Yet those huge, geeky lenses and fat black frames hide a secret. These glasses show Callie what other people are thinking. Maybe they will actually help her. And she can use all of the help she can get. She’s lost in math and Spanish classes. Her best friend seems to be drifting away. And her parents’ marriage is falling apart. But can Callie follow the eye doctor’s instructions and learn to use the glasses wisely?

Wed, 04/25/2012 - 12:14pm
The Untold Civil War: Exploring the Human Side of War

The University of Mary Washington's 2012 Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series concludes on Thursday, April 26, with a lecture on lives of Civil War soldiers by James Robertson, author of The Untold Civil War: Exploring the Human Side of War.

Professor Robertson spoke previously as part of the Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series on Stonewall Jackson. He returns to UMW to discuss the daily lives of the Civil War soldiers.  That topic is treated in the latest of his numerous books, The Untold Civil War, which is a visually striking collection of the 132 episodes of his popular public radio “Civil War Series” stories, illustrated with 475 rare images of battle scenes, artifacts, and people. Having retired recently from the history faculty at Virginia Tech, he achieved iconic stature as a Civil War scholar, going back to his appointment as executive director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission, working with Presidents Kennedy and Johnson in marking the war’s 100th anniversary. The recipient of every major award given in the Civil War field— and a mesmerizing lecturer of national acclaim — Bud Robertson is probably more in demand as a speaker before Civil War groups than anyone else in the field.

All lectures in the university's Great Lives series are free and open to the public.

For more about the life of a Civil War soldier check out these resources from the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.

Wed, 04/25/2012 - 3:31am
Around My French Table: More than 300 Recipes from My Home to Yours by Dorie Gre

Upon first glancing at Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table, I very nearly put it aside to be reshelved. It was too beautiful. Huge and heavy--laden with photographs--and featuring a cover shot of something that looked as though it took a heck of a lot of time, money and energy to pull off, it didn’t seem like something that would work for me.

But first glances can be deceiving. Almost every recipe involves relatively normal if delicious ingredients. The techniques used are not difficult at all for someone who knows her way around a basic kitchen. These are the sort of recipes which will be made again and again--and be shared with demanding friends. Each is introduced very charmingly, in a way that conveys much about the author’s French experiences.

Tue, 04/24/2012 - 3:31am
Cinderella Ate My Daughter

Peggy Orenstein has established an entire career around her ability to describe and analyze the ways young women learn, socialize, and advance into adulthood. She even wrote a highly influential book exposing how gender dynamics operate within the American education system (Schoolgirls). When her own daughter became ensnared in “girlie-girl” culture, however, Orenstein was forced to admit that her extensive academic knowledge did not prepare her to negotiate the paradoxes of growing up female in the 21st century. Cinderella Ate My Daughter chronicles Orenstein’s parenting crisis and her subsequent investigation into how femininity is being scripted by marketing, princess mania, and popular culture.

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 3:34pm
Humbug: The Art of P.T. Barnum

The University of Mary Washington's 2012 Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series continues on Tuesday, April 24, with a lecture on P.T. Barnum by Neil Harris, author of Humbug: The Art of P.T. Barnum.

Contrary to legend, he never said, “There’s a sucker born every minute.” Phineas Taylor Barnum was a businessman, hoaxer, and impresario who provided entertainment to a nation hungry for it. “I am a showman by profession . . . and all the gilding shall make nothing else of me,” Barnum wrote defiantly in his autobiography. In an authoritative biography of Barnum, author Neil Harris, professor of history at the University of Chicago, describes the culture and climate of America in the nineteenth century that produced such an outsized, and sometimes outrageous, figure.  Harris has written widely on various aspects of the evolution of American cultural life and on the social history of art and design.

All lectures in the university's Great Lives series are free and open to the public.

For more about the life of P.T. Barnum check out these resources from the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.

Mon, 04/23/2012 - 3:30am
The Seventeenth Child by Dorothy Marie Rice & Lucille Mabel Walthall Payne

The Seventeenth Child, by Dorothy Marie Rice & Lucille Mabel Walthall Payne, sets down the memories of a childhood lived in the countryside of 1930s Virginia by a black woman who grew up before the Civil Rights Movement made so many gains.  These remembrances are plain, soft-spoken and ring true to an age that was certainly different from the one we know.  In some ways, it was a harder time as in her earliest years even basic food was very hard to come by and the sharecropping system made it difficult for all farmers, black and white, to get ahead or even stay afloat during the bad harvest years.

But it was the warmth of family, faith, shared hardship and simple joys that made those days good as well as difficult. The children worked, not only because their help was needed but because it was understood that working was a good thing in and of itself. They helped pull and tend tobacco, can vegetables, sew quilts, raise chickens, and shell corn.  Lucille Payne tells of how hard it was to earn money. How sometimes her mother might not be paid much more than fifty cents for a hard day’s washing of filthy clothes in a dark and cold shed. Well, fifty cents and a hambone that might not be fit to eat without it being scrubbed, too, and sometimes not even then. But her mother said, “Well, you accept what they give you; next time it might be better.”

It wasn’t all about acceptance. Sometimes Lucille would see her mother spit in the water while she washed and she would ask her why she did that. “That helps to get them clean.”  But I know she was just so angry because she had to survive.  When you have so many children you have to survive the best way you can.  Likewise, when white children rode the bus to their segregated school, leaving the black children to walk and even calling them names, the black children got a bit of revenge…and a chance to be better than their so-called betters with an act of charity.

Fri, 04/20/2012 - 1:20pm
Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography

These days it’s not uncommon for history to be brought vividly to life in a novelized comic book format called graphic novels.  Recently Sid Jacobson, the author of one such title with teen appeal, spoke as part of the Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series at the University of Mary Washington

His book, “Anne Frank: The Anne Frank House Authorized Graphic Biography,” co-written with Ernie Colon, provides insight into Anne’s life before and after her famous diary.  When Hitler came to power, her father moved his family from Germany to the Netherlands hoping for safety.  After the Nazi’s invade and begin restricting Jewish activity, Anne and Margot wonder how they will stay cool with the local swimming pool now forbidden.  At the same time, their father desperately attempts to get his family out of the country and when that fails, finds a hiding place in the now famous secret annex.  The most difficult and compelling parts of this tale occur after their betrayal.   We follow the family to the concentration camp, where they are first separated by gender and then the mother from her daughters.  Thanks to information from camp survivors, we learn that Margot perished first, shortly followed by Anne.  Fans of Anne Frank’s diary will enjoy these new details in this heroic young woman’s life.