LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
Wed, 03/28/2012 - 8:43am
River Marked

I used to have an old Volvo that broke down frequently. The problem was a hose that would fly off of the engine. I always carried a screwdriver which I would use to reattach the hose and go on my way. One morning I was rushing in the door to work after one of these episodes when my supervisor stopped me. “What happened to you?” she asked with concern. I had no idea what she was talking about until I followed her eyes down to my arms and realized that my forearms were covered with black dirt and grease.

I explained about having to fix my car on the way to work, and she just stood and stared at me silently for a very awkward minute. Suddenly she burst into song! “I am woman. Hear me roar. With numbers too big to ignore. And I’ve come too far to turn back and pretend.” She turned to walk away but kept on singing at the top of her lungs. Her song only died away when she turned the corner and went down the other hall. 

Right then and there I decided to get a new car.

Tue, 03/27/2012 - 3:31am
Believing Is Seeing: Observations on the Mysteries of Photography by Errol Morri

“Our beliefs do not determine what is true or false. They do not determine objective reality. But they do determine what we see.”

In Believing Is Seeing, Errol Morris investigates the complex relationship between documentary photographs and the truth we assume they deliver. Best known as the gifted documentarian behind films such as The Fog of War, Standard Operating Procedure, and The Thin Blue Line, Morris has spent years pondering how authenticity, truth, and appearance converge and complicate one another. It is hardly surprising then that Morris’s analysis of documentary photography is insightful and accessible.

Errol Morris’s cinematic explorations often fixate on a specific figure or series of events. He then breathes life into the topic by artfully combining provocative interviews and extensive research. Believing is Seeing successfully incorporates this methodology while simultaneously deconstructing the very notion of documentary veracity. The book consists of essays, each one describing a case study in which documentary photographs created controversy, conflicting interpretations, or troubling implications. Morris elucidates both the context and reception of each image with interviews and archival research.

He also analyzes both contemporary and historical images, demonstrating that many of the same issues and questions have been recurring since the advent of photography. Whether the photograph was taken in 1855 during the Crimean War or in 2003 at Abu Ghraib, our collective tendency to equate an image with a finalized truth has been problematic. To borrow Morris’s succinct phrasing, “…photographs allow us to think we know more than we really do. We can imagine a context that isn’t really there.”

Tue, 03/27/2012 - 3:31am
Robert Green, Chief of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe

This interview airs beginning Wednesday, March 28.
The Patawomeck Indians played an important role during the clash over the first Virginia settlement at Jamestown. Robert Green, the 21st century Patawomeck Chief, talks to Debby Klein about his work to preserve the rich lineage of his tribe on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

Mon, 03/26/2012 - 4:07pm
Great Lives Lecture Series: Sherlock Holmes

The University of Mary Washington's 2012 Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series continues on Tuesday, March 27, with a lecture on Sherlock Holmes by Jeremy Black, author of London: A History.

The game’s afoot when British historian and professor of history at the University of Exeter Jeremy Black elucidates the scintillating mind of Sherlock Holmes; the tenebrous character of Dr. Moriarty; and the rather obtuse Dr. Watson, who chronicled Holmes’ adventures. Professor Black analyzes Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous character and the escapades that emanated from Holmes’ digs at 221B, where it is always 1895 in London.   Black is the author of more than 100 books on European (and especially British) history, including London: A History.  He has previously given highly popular Great Lives lectures on figures ranging from George III and Napoleon to James Bond.

All lectures in the university's Great Lives series are free and open to the public.

For more about the life of Sherlock Holmes check out these resources from the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.

Mon, 03/26/2012 - 3:30am
God Is in the Pancakes by Robin Epstein

Grace Manning is a fifteen-year-old candy striper at a local nursing home, Hanover House, with a spunky attitude. Her life has been in a free fall since her father recently left her mother, sister, and her to build a new life with a woman from the church where he used to take his daughters every Sunday. Grace's mother doesn't quite have a stance on her beliefs about God, but church was always the place Grace and her sister Sophie went with their father.  Now that their father is gone Grace has to come to terms with her religious beliefs. In God is in the Pancakes, by Robin Epstein, Grace must sort out life, love, friendship, and God. 

Fri, 03/23/2012 - 11:59am
A Taste for War by William C. Davis

When one thinks about the U.S. Civil War, or the War Between the States, one does not come up with images of food and recipes.  Rather, it is the exact opposite: we think about hunger and even starvation.  But the truth is, some of the most creative recipes are invented at times when the basic food elements are scarce.

Fri, 03/23/2012 - 8:31am
Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg is a wonderful book. It's funny, it's southern, it has quirky characters, but a wonderful sense of family and place. "This classic and folksy novel takes readers back to the thirties, where a friendship blooms between two girls who run a homey, little cafe in Alabama. A story of food, love, laughter, and even murder unfolds as an elderly woman relates her life story to a middle-aged friend." (Book summary). 

If you like Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe here are similar titles that you may enjoy:

Clover by Dori Sanders
After her father dies within hours of being married to a white woman, a ten-year-old black girl learns with her new mother to overcome grief and to adjust to a new place in their rural black South Carolina community. (catalog summary)



Cold Sassy Tree by Olive Ann Burns.
July 5, 1906...was the day E. Rucker Blakeslee, proprietor of the general store and barely three weeks a
widower, eloped with Miss Love Simpson - a woman half his age and, worse yet, a Yankee. (synopsis)



Wed, 07/22/2015 - 4:15pm
Zita the Spacegirl by Ben Hatke

Zita the Spacegirl gets down to business right away. It starts with two friends, a mysterious crater, and a device that opens a portal to another dimension.

Meek Joseph is immediately captured by a tentacled being with a deep sea diver's helmet. Adventurous Zita, in a daring effort to save her friend, follows the creature through the portal. A strange alien planet exists on the other side, and Zita finds that she is not welcomed with open arms.

Wed, 07/22/2015 - 4:15pm
The Left Bank Gang by Jason

The Left Bank Gang opens with a dog shuffling down the streets of 1920's Paris, keeping mostly to himself. He ignores a panhandler, but then sees another dog that he recognizes. They shake hands. One dog's name is Ezra Pound. The other's is Ernest Hemingway.

Gang is a clever nugget of alternate history fiction. Rather than focusing on complex geopolitical questions like "What if the Germans won World War II?"  Norwegian cartoonist Jason turns to the zeitgeist of expatriate writers such as Pound, Fitzgerald, Joyce, and Hemingway. His hypothesis is "What if all of these starving geniuses just got fed up and turned to crime?"

Fri, 03/23/2012 - 11:51am
Versus by Summer Shank

As spring arrives, so does the artwork! We in Youth Services always look forward to this time of year when the weather becomes nicer and we have the privilege of seeing the work of so many local talented artists. We had an amazing and thrilling turn out this year for our 17th Annual Teen Art Show. Once again, local artist Johnny Johnson honored us by judging grades 11-12, and the artists from grades 11-12 judged grades 9-10.

This year also saw the introduction of "Artists with Influence," a chance for our amazing teen artists to give back to the community. In this case, teens have the opportunity to donate their art to Hope House, which provides a safe haven for homeless mothers and their children residing in the Central Rappahannock region who want to learn the life skills needed to become self-sufficient. As they do so, our donated artwork will be placed in their homes.

The exhibit will be available from March 3 - March 26, in the Headquarters Theater and Atrium for public viewing during regular library hours, except when programs are scheduled in the theater.

On to the winners!

View this slideshow for all winning works (displayed in order). You can also view all winning works on Flickr.

Best in Show

Savannah Patterson for Safety Net - Massaponax High School

Grades 11-12

1st Place: Christine Stacy for Little Red Firecracker - Massaponax High School

2nd Place: Tiffany St. Julien for Black and White - North Stafford High School

3rd Place: Shannon Wright for Close and Personal - Massaponax High School

Honorable Mentions:

Caiti Wardlaw for Inked Expression - Stafford High School

Raven Souza for Serenade - North Stafford High School

Grades 9-10

1st Place: Isabella M. K. Nguyen Dillon for Self-Portrait  - Massaponax High School

2nd Place: Elizabeth Fauth for Spray of Color - Brooke Point High School

3rd Place: Summer Shank for Versus - Chancellor High School

Honorable Mention: Summer Shank for Jefferson's Berries - Chancellor High School