LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
04/05/2011 - 1:21pm
Curator of Collections Mary Helen Dellinger

This interview airs beginning April 6.
Exhibits at the Fredericksburg Area Museum are exciting to see, but there are many objects in the museum collection that are not generally on public view. Here is an opportunity to see a few of these hidden treasures. Today, we are treated to a display of toys of the 19th and 20th centuries when Debby Klein visits Curator of Collections Mary Helen Dellinger on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

04/05/2011 - 9:36am
Make a Monster by Fiona Goble

Fiona Goble makes a herd of fleece monsters that are cuddly and sweet in Make a Monster. She creates 15 easy-to-make toys out of fleece scraps. As a fabric addict, my goal this year is to use up my scraps, and this book helped. I fell in love with Toby, the sleeping bunny, and I had a scrap of bright yellow fleece in my stash so I made a herd of them to give as gifts.  I love that she gives each toy a name; I think the devilishly red Leo will be my next project.

The sweet monster toys have step-by-step directions with pictures Toby, the Sleeping Bunnyto follow of each step and full-size patterns in the back to copy and use. I love a craft book with color pictures of all the projects, and this one fits the bill. She also has explanations for all the embroidery stitches you will need and rates the difficulty of the sewing--and most projects are quite easy. Some toys have adorable clothes such as shorts and skirts and need a little more sewing experience. She adds a “Cool Idea” to each project where you can give a little twist to make your toy even more unique.

With a few buttons and stitches, you can give your monsters their own personalities!

 

04/05/2011 - 9:40am
17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore

Rules. Sometimes they’re awful and constricting, keeping us from doing what we want. 

That’s the situation in “17 Things I’m Not Allowed to Do Anymore” by Jenny Offill and Nancy Carpenter. It’s a humorous look at a child learning the rules by doing the wrong things. “I had an idea to do my George Washington report on beavers instead. I am not allowed to do reports on beavers anymore.” The poor girl progresses through a variety of bad ideas like stapling her brother’s hair to his pillow and giving him the gift of cauliflower. All, she learns, are forbidden. Illustrated with pen and ink, actual photographs of the offending items, (the stapler, the cauliflower) are humorously interspersed.
 
04/04/2011 - 12:21pm
Hold Me Closer, Necromancer

Sam LaCroix has got some serious issues. He’s a college dropout working a dead-end job in fast food and an elderly next-door neighbor who has more of a night life than he does. But at least none of Sam’s problems verge on the darker side of paranormal…until now.

Hold Me Closer, Necromancer, by Lish McBride, is the story of one man’s journey from slacker to soul reaver. The only things Sam has going for himself are playing hockey with potatoes in the parking lot and betting when the rookie employee is finally going to crack under the pressure. This all changes when a renegade tater obliterates a car’s tail light.

04/04/2011 - 3:30am
Artist Diego Rivera

We'll be screening Art and Revolution in Mexico (51 min., 2005) on Tuesday, April 5, 7pm, Headquarters Library theater.

Mexico has an unmatched legacy of painters who have recorded history in a most outspoken way. Rivera, Siquerios, and Orosco among others, produced some of the finest examples of socio/political art in their famous murals and frescoes.

This film is recommended for high school age students and up.

Art Films in the Library are offered In partnership with the Fredericksburg Center for Creative Arts and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Find out about upcoming films!

04/02/2011 - 12:42pm
Five Minutes of Heaven

Come join the Rappahannock Film Club as we present Five Minutes of Heaven (2009) starring Liam Neeson on Saturday, April 2nd at 2pm at the Headquarters Library.

From the Oscar®-nominated director of Downfall, the BAFTA-winning screenwriter of Omagh, and star Liam Neeson comes a startling new thriller inspired by true events: In 1975, 17-year-old Irish-Protestant Alistair Little assassinated 19-year-old Catholic Jim Griffin in his Ulster home. The murder was witnessed by Griffin s 11-year-old brother Joe. Thirty years later, Little (Neeson) has been rehabilitated and released from prison, while Joe Griffin (James) remains traumatized and bitter. But when a television talk show decides to bring them together for a live on-air reconciliation, two men haunted by one moment must come face-to-face with their own worlds of pain, violence and vengeance. This is a must-see drama that dares to explore both sides of Northern Ireland s troubled past as it comes to terms with its still uncertain future.

06/13/2014 - 11:23am
eSequels

A series is defined as two or more books that share the same characters, setting,  and/or locale, and the story arc develops in each subequent book in the series.

If you like to read books in series, you will love the eSequels database!  Click on the eSequels link from the library's "research" page. You will need to enter the 14-digit barcode from your library card when prompted.  Based on the print title Sequels, eSequels is the always-being-updated online version and has listings for adult titles, from Christian fiction to gritty noir mystery series.  You can search eSequels by author, title or character, or by location, subject or keyword.  Each entry will give you information about the author and the series, a link to the author's homepage and and annoated listing for the titles, in series order.  (Don't worry, the annotations will not "give away" any crucial plot points).

04/01/2011 - 7:54am
John Adams by David McCullough

 This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

John Adams by David McCullough: "In this powerful, epic biography, David McCullough unfolds the adventurous life-journey of John Adams, the brilliant, fiercely independent, often irascible, always honest Yankee patriot -- 'the colossus of independence,' as Thomas Jefferson called him -- who spared nothing in his zeal for the American Revolution; who rose to become the second President of the United States and saved the country from blundering into an unnecessary war; who was learned beyond all but a few and regarded by some as 'out of his senses'; and whose marriage to the wise and valiant Abigail Adams is one of the moving love stories in American history."

Books similar to John Adams by David McCullough include other biographies of famous people, or perhaps books set in that time/place.  Here is a selection of possibilities:

1776 by David McCullough
Based on extensive research in both American and British archives, 1776 is the story of Americans in the ranks, men of every shape, size, and color, farmers, schoolteachers, shoemakers, no-accounts, and mere boys turned soldiers. And it is the story of the British commander, William Howe, and his highly disciplined redcoats who looked on their rebel foes with contempt and fought with a valor too little known. But it is the American commander-in-chief who stands foremost -- Washington, who had never before led an army in battle. (Catalog summary)
 

Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood by Alexandra Fuller
Fuller's memoir of a childhood dominated by the Rhodesian civil war of 1971-1979 captures the fascinating life of a white family living in one of the most remote regions of Africa.

 

 

03/31/2011 - 3:30am
The Case of the Case of Mistaken Identity

Steve Brixton definitely doesn’t have a brother, and he absolutely is not a detective. He’s just a huge fan of the old Bailey Brothers detective stories, which entirely make up Steve’s top 59 list of favorite books.

So why does everyone keep calling him a detective? That’s the central question in The Case of the Case of Mistaken Identity by Mac Barnett. Steve simply came into the library on a Saturday morning to research this stupid paper on needlework when a bunch of sinister looking people dressed all in black started flying down on ropes, bursting through windows and chasing him without mercy. This couldn’t possibly be related to his overdue fines…could it?

04/04/2011 - 2:22pm

Artist and author Glen Rounds was neither a tenderfoot nor a city slicker. He was the real deal of the nearly Wild West--though he wasn’t beyond telling a few tall tales, too, here and there. Born in a sod house in the Badlands of South Dakota, when he was just a babe he and his family traveled by covered wagon to the open spaces of Montana.

Spinning Tales for His Supper
 
Glen grew up on a horse ranch and worked as a mule skinner, a cowboy, and a carnival artist, but eventually his talents took him into the big city—Kansas City’s Art Institute where he studied for two years. In 1930, he moved to New York City and started taking night classes at the Art Students League and tried to sell stories during the day. He would visit publishers’ houses to sell his work, arriving in the late morning so he could grab a free meal—a trick he managed by starting a good story and offering to finish it over lunch. His artistic style was spare and rather rough, but it was perfect for the often funny, sometimes somber stories he wove about the American West.