LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
09/14/2010 - 4:17pm

Everyone knows times are tough. Budget cuts and belt-tightening are commonplace.

The library has felt the pinch too, but we know we'll carry on and continue to offer the best possible service to our patrons.

Humor often helps us through the hard times, so we'd like to share this video, inspired by the 1978 disco hit "I Will Survive," made by and featuring CRRL staff.

You can also check out this longer version, which begins with a send-up of a typically hectic day in the life of a professional librarian.

09/14/2010 - 3:14pm

    Duncan and Samantha, our newest library babies, are just a few months old, but they’re not too young for books.  Board books, made of heavy cardboard with just a few words on each page, fit babies’ interests and attention spans perfectly.  They are just the right size for lap sharing, and their sturdy construction means you can safely prop them up next to a baby who’s too little to hold them but big enough to pick up her head and enjoy the pictures.


    My favorite board book to give to babies is Tana Hoban’s “Black & White.”  First published as two separate board books, “Black on White” and “White on Black,” the new edition includes both books in an unfolding accordion-style format, just right for standing up in the crib of a curious infant.

09/14/2010 - 10:02am

I am a loving (and interfering) mother of a 20-year-old son so I thought I would read What I Wish I Knew When I was 20: A Crash Course on Making Your Place in the World and pass it on to him. I admit to sending him emails about Erik Erikson’s Stages of Development and what he should be doing as a young adult: intimacy versus isolation (Son, pick the correct side of the equation!) so I thought this book would give him a head’s up.

The author, Tina Seelig, also a mother of a 20 year old son, teaches courses on entrepreneurship at Stanford University and is a voice for creative thinking and problem solving. I especially like her examples in this book of innovative ways to come up with solutions. She gives her students an item – paper clips or rubber bands, for example – and challenges them to create as much value as possible with the item. 
09/13/2010 - 4:03pm

For September we've added 30 adult titles, 26 of which are are available in MP3 format (suitable for iPods, iPhones, iPads, etc.). We also received 7 new children's/young adult titles (5 available in MP3). Check out our most recent additions!

Browse our newest downloadable audiobooks in the library catalog,  or go directly to the NetLibrary web site (free account needed) or Media Center (install required) to download. If you don't have a NetLibrary account, follow these simple instructions to create one.

New eAudiobooks for September 2010

09/13/2010 - 8:58am

What would happen if you met someone who had the exact same name as you? Would you examine them, looking for any similarities and differences desperately trying to figure the other one out? Two high school students from suburban Chicago are about to find out, and both of them are Will Grayson in Will Grayson, Will Grayson  by John Green and David Levithan.

One lives by two rules: 1. Don’t care too much. 2. Shut Up. By following them, Will has made it through life without too many bruises. Unfortunately, his best friend Tiny Cooper is royally wrecking everything for him. Royal is appropriate for Tiny, a gigantic queen who just happens to be the school’s best football player and the writer/director/star of his own biographic musical, Tiny Dancer. This, along with Tiny’s constant attempts to get Will to go out with their mutual friend Jane, is exactly the kind of attention that Will does not want.

12/05/2013 - 4:19pm
If you like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson
The disappearance forty years ago of Harriet Vanger, a young scion of one of the wealthiest families in Sweden, gnaws at her octogenarian uncle, Henrik Vanger. He is determined to know the truth about what he believes was her murder. He hires crusading journalist Mikael Blomkvist, recently at the wrong end of a libel case, to get to the bottom of Harriet's disappearance. Lisbeth Salander, a twenty-four-year-old, pierced, tattooed genius hacker, possessed of the hard-earned wisdom of someone twice her age--and a terrifying capacity for ruthlessness--assists Blomkvist with the investigation. This unlikely team discovers a vein of nearly unfathomable iniquity running through the Vanger family, an astonishing corruption at the highest echelon of Swedish industrialism--and a surprising connection between themselves.

If you like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (followed by the next two books in the Millennium trilogy: The Girl Who Played with Fire and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest), you may like these titles -- some have intriguingly complex plots, while others offer portraits of unusual, unique females.
 

Beat the Reaper
by Josh Bazell
The carefully orchestrated life of Manhattan emergency room doctor and witness-protection program participant Peter Brown unravels in the course of a high-stakes day that begins with a mugging, an elevator encounter with a sexy pharmaceutical rep, and a new patient who knows him from his previous existence.

 


A Beautiful Place to Die by Malla NunnA Beautiful Place to Die
by Malla Nunn
"Jacob's Rest, a tiny town on the border between South Africa and Mozambique, 1952. An Afrikaner police officer is found dead. Detective Emmanuel Cooper, a man of uncertain parentage in a country that demands racial purity, follows a trail of clues that lead him to uncover a shocking forbidden love and the imperfect life of one Captain Pretorius."-catalog summary
 

09/14/2010 - 11:08am

Chef, author, and T.V. personality Julia Child, communicates her joy and passion for life, people, and French food in My Life in France, written with Alex Prud’homme. Beginning with her and her husband’s move to Paris working for the United States Information Service, Julia Child relates their adventures as government employees living in post-WW II Europe. From Paris to Marseilles to Bonn to Washington D.C. to Norway, Child provides a rich, sensory experience for the reader.

09/08/2010 - 7:59am

Ever since he was a small boy, Will, hero of The Ruins of Gorlan by John Flanagan (Book 1 of The Ranger's Apprentice series), has dreamed of Choosing Day and the moment he can start training as a knight. Will, along with Horace, Alyss, Jenny, and the other castle wards raised by Baron Arald’s generosity, is now 15 years old, and about to leave the familiar confines of the castle to start his career apprenticeship. The other wards have obvious talents that will translate easily into their apprenticeships: Horace, a muscular boy and natural athlete is destined for battleschool; willowy and sophisticated Alyss for the Diplomatic Service; and friendly, food-loving Jenny to Master Chubb’s kitchens. Will’s destination is harder to predict, for where will this tree-climbing, wall-scaling teen fit in?

It turns out that Will is not selected for battleschool, but rather to become the apprentice of Halt the Ranger, part of an enigmatic group of men who use camouflage, superior bow skills, and secrecy to achieve their missions on behalf of the King. Over the next few months, Will’s disappointment over battleschool changes to grudging respect for Halt and the grueling training that the Rangers undergo to become proficient in their craft. He also starts to see in the quietly competent Halt the father figure that he has been without for his childhood.

09/07/2010 - 11:07am

General OneFile is not the Commander of the Allied Forces or the latest comic book character, but it is a supreme superhero: General OneFile is an awesome database of magazine and newspaper articles about anything and everything you may want or need to know. With about 97 million entries originally published from 1980 to the present day, I daresay you’ll find something pertinent to any search you undertake. For instance:

Want a recipe for ohagi (Japanese sticky rice balls with red bean paste) or yeatelt wett (an Ethiopian winter vegetable medley)?
            General OneFile serves it up!
 
Want a political cartoon from the Reagan era?
            Print one free from General OneFile!
 
Want a children’s review of the latest picture book to hit the best seller list?
            Read it on General OneFile!
 
Want to know what the experts say about investing in this economy?
            General OneFile keeps you current!
 
Want the latest Hollywood gossip?
            General OneFile has it covered!
 
09/07/2010 - 9:00am

One of those classics that eluded me through high school and college English classes, The Good Earth surfaced for me recently as I read a favorable review of a new biography of Buck [Pearl Buck in China: Journey to The Good Earth by Hilary Spurling]. I was reminded that TGE had been awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1932 and Buck the Nobel Prize for literature in 1938. Maybe I should see if the library still has a copy... Yes! Many copies, many formats. People are still reading it, these many years later.  The CRRL paperback that came my way was identified as an Oprah's Book Club selection in 2004.

TGE tells the story of peasant farmer Wang Lung, his lifelong relationship with the land and the family he creates with his wife O-Lan. Buck makes these simple people the face of a China that is in the beginning throes of the political upheaval that would transform centuries-old cultural and societal norms over the course of the 20th century. At the outset we follow Wang Lung as he sets out to buy his wife, a slave in the house of Hwang; O-Lan is considered a good buy since she is too ugly to have been defiled by the rich men in the big house. The book is suffused with irony; the author draws her characters, paints the world for the reader as seen through their eyes. The devastating effect of years of flood and famine on the Wang Lungs across rural China is remarkably drawn without fanfare or hyperbole. Their brutal world where begging, infanticide, and mysogeny are unquestioned is filled with stoic, illiterate, patient people. In the end, the land enriches Wang Lung, and his epic rags to riches journey is a page turner.