LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
Mon, 05/09/2011 - 3:30am
The Sky Is Everywhere

Lennie, a 17-year-old bookworm and band geek, has always walked, safe and happy, in the shadow of her dynamic older sister, Bailey. But when Bailey dies suddenly, Lennie is left to cope with life in this intense debut novel The Sky is Everywhere, by Jandy Nelson.

Even through her grief, Lennie, who’s barely had a boyfriend before, finds herself drawn toward two completely different guys. The first is Bailey’s boyfriend, who is also suffering from the loss. Lennie and Toby both recognize that their relationship is wrong, but can’t seem to stop themselves. And then there’s Joe, the new kid in school, who just moved here from Paris and who helps Lennie forget her pain with his beautiful smile and musical talent. Music plays a major part in the story, bringing them together with Joe even nicknaming her John Lennon. Meanwhile, Lennie is eaten up with guilt over hooking up with Toby. Wearing her dead sister’s clothes and dating her boyfriend seems to keep Bailey alive. Only with each other can they share their true feelings of sadness.
Thu, 09/22/2016 - 1:10pm
If you like books by Patricia Cornwell

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

Patricia Cornwell writes crime novels and is known especially for her series featuring Dr. Kay Scarpetta, a medical examiner. Her book Postmortem, which is the first novel to feature Dr. Scarpetta, won a slew of awards, including the Edgar Award and the Macavity Award for best first mystery.

 

If you like books by Patricia Cornwell, here are some other books and authors that you might like:




The Alibi Man
by Tami Hoag
Former narcotics detective Elena Estes just wants to be left alone, but when a colleague is murdered, her hunt for the killer leads her straight back to the smarmy Palm Beach crowd she abandoned long ago. (Library Journal)

 


 


Devil Bones by Kathy Reichs
In a house under renovation in Charlotte, North Carolina, a plumber discovers a forgotten cellar, and some rather grisly remains—the severed head of a teenage girl, several decapitated chickens, and a couple of cauldrons containing beads, feathers, bones, and other relics of religious ceremonies. In a river not far away, an adolescent boy's torso carved with a pentagram, is found. Are these crimes the work of Satanists and devil worshipers? (catalog summary)

 

 

 

Tue, 09/20/2016 - 9:54am

In Jacqueline Davies’ The Lemonade War, Jessie Treski and her brother Evan have a pretty good relationship…usually. But when Evan finds out that Jessie will be skipping third grade and will share his fourth-grade classroom, he gets pretty angry. It’s bad enough that his sister gets all the good grades, but now she is going to mess up things with his friends as well. His anger grows…and grows…and then he explodes, saying awful things to her that he knows he will regret later. Jessie responds and their argument swells until they make a wager with high odds, all riding on who can sell the most lemonade in the last five days before school starts.

Wed, 05/04/2011 - 2:29pm
Soul Searching

Some people find faith in a blinding flash, like Saul/Paul on the road to Damascus.  For others, this can be a lifelong journey.  Share the various roads followed (and destinations found!) on the these spiritual journeys of finding and losing faith, returning to church, searching for meaning or experiencing profound spirituality outside of organized religion in the updated booklist "Soul Searching."

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 7:58pm

In Georgia Bottoms, Georgia has a lot on her plate--a mother one appetizer short of being “out to lunch,” an unemployed brother more off the wagon than on, and a series of clandestine lovers scheduled six out of seven nights a week.

Although she’s always been able to juggle her unusual responsibilities, Georgia’s Saturday night man, Eugene Hendrix--who also happens to be the town’s (married) preacher--finds himself riddled with guilt.  That guilt, in turn, results in a confession to his wife, Brenda.  Eager for retaliation, Brenda demands that Georgia’s secrets be revealed to the entire town…via the church pulpit.  Georgia employs her vast feminine wiles to avert a last minute disaster.  Her next step is to arrange surreptitious relocation for Eugene (and his family) to another congregation…far, far away.

Wed, 05/04/2011 - 3:31am
Talking Books

At the Central Rappahannock Regional Library we offer services for all readers. I manage Assistive Services which provides talking books to people who can no longer read standard print. People with dyslexia, physical handicaps, vision impairment, or blindness are eligible for this service.

Tue, 05/03/2011 - 3:31am
Blotto, Twinks and the ex-King's Daughter

The other day, the puppy ran away with a pair of socks from the laundry basket and I thought “the wee bloke has scarpered." When he dropped them in my hand when I asked, I thought “oh, how spiffing!” I have fondly called my elderly jack russell terrier an “old trouser button” more than once.

 What could possibly have brought on these linguistic oddities?  Well, I have been reading Blotto, Twinks and the ex-King’s Daughter by Simon Brett.  This British cozy mystery, set in the time period between the world wars, is full of wonderful phrases and boffing lingo.

Wed, 07/06/2011 - 10:28am
Charles and Emma

A mountain of information has been written about Charles Darwin’s life, ideas and adventures, but this may be the first book about his romance with Emma Wedgwood. The dilemma? Emma was staunchly religious while Charles was bound to science and his revolutionary idea of the origin of species. Charles and Emma: The Darwins' Leap of Faith, by Deborah Heiligman, examines the true story of their courtship, marriage and family life as a backdrop to Darwin’s famous discoveries.

Faced with the question of whether or not to marry, Darwin, ever the scientist, compiled a list – a wife, he wrote, is “better than a dog” but then again he’d have “less money for books.” Eventually, Darwin did decide to marry Emma and the couple spent many happy years together.

Fri, 04/29/2011 - 7:27am
Summer Sisters by Judy Blume

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Summer Sisters by Judy Blume: "The story concerns rather implausibly a friendship begun when Caitlin and Vix (for Victoria) are 12. Caitlin, daughter of wealthy, divorced parents, declares that Vix, eldest daughter in a blue-collar family, will be her best friend. Caitlin invites Vix to spend the summer at the family home on Martha's Vineyard. Vix is taken in by Caitlin's family, who arrange for her scholarship to private school and then support her Harvard education. Summers on the Vineyard are filled with sun and adolescent sexual encounters. The girls' friendship endures betrayal, love for the same man, and diverging career paths." (Library Journal)

If you enjoyed Summer Sisters by Judy Blume, these stories about women and friendship may appeal to you:

Annie Freeman’s Fabulous Traveling Funeral by Kris Radish
“For Katherine Givens and the four women about to become her best friends, the adventure begins with a UPS package. Inside is a pair of red sneakers filled with ashes and a note that will forever change their lives. Katherine's oldest and dearest friend, the irrepressible Annie Freeman, left one final request - a traveling funeral - and she wants the most important women in her life as ‘pallbearers’."—summary from book jacket


Anybody Out There by Marian Keyes.
Anna Walsh returns to her Dublin family after a serious and disfiguring accident. She wants to return to her life in New York City, but she has more than physical healing to do.





 

Mon, 05/02/2011 - 10:01am
Ready, Set, Grow!

Sometimes you want to do more than just dig in the dirt, and a targeted gardening project is an excellent way to develop green thumbs. DK’s new gardening book for kids, Ready, Set, Grow! Quick and Easy Gardening Projects, offers some creative and colorful projects that won’t break the bank or send you all around town looking for obscure ingredients. Like all DK books, this one offers wonderful photographs and cheery art, making it a visual feast for the eyes as well. I loved the decorations that we can make out of foil containers, the garden buddy made out of recycled materials, and the “strawberry boot,” made from a pair of old rain boots.

There is also lots of gardening information here, such as a list of quick-to-grow plants that offer quick gratification when growing from seed (try marigolds, nasturtiums, and clary sage). There is a handy list of top microgreens, and how to grow salad greens in a succession to ensure you always have a salad handy. There are a few recipes along the way for Asian stir-fry, sun tea, nasturtium salad, and more. I loved the step-by-step instructions to make a floral tepee from morning glory seeds and branches. We will be creating ours right after Mother’s Day, and by summer’s end we’ll have a magical play area that we created ourselves.

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