LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
Wed, 07/22/2015 - 12:21pm
Before Versailles by Karleen Koen

Karleen Koen’s Before Versailles is a splendidly rich story of romantic intrigue set in the early days of the Sun King’s rule. Louis XIV is a very young and handsome king. Newly-married to a virtuous if plain Spanish princess, he is determined to be true to his vows, but the ladies at court have other ideas—particularly his brother’s wife.

Mon, 06/01/2015 - 3:21pm
Cover to Throne of Glass

Do you LOVE Assassin’s Creed? So do I! Maybe not for the same reason as you, unless you really love to geek out over how historically accurate they make their games. They do their research, and they do it well, which makes this history major squeal with glee. But, truly, there are so many reasons to love Assassin’s Creed: history; assassins; action; adventure; and even a dash of mythology and romance. There are just so many books that can be matched to it!

Tue, 06/02/2015 - 2:28pm

Every morning, Patricia (Trisha) Polacco wakes to the sounds of singing birds on her old Michigan farm. She goes downstairs, pours herself a cup of coffee, and then plays an antique music box, enjoying its magical beauty. She then sits in her favorite chair, rocks and rocks, and dreams of stories, old and new, that she can tell to children through her words and her drawings.

Thu, 05/28/2015 - 12:01pm
Cover to Snow Crash

Science fiction offers a rich history and has gone through many changes since its birth almost 200 years ago. The genre is so much more than mere aliens, robots, and time travel. It allows us to address complex issues in an accessible way.

Thu, 05/28/2015 - 11:10am
Cover to Why We Broke Up

"Because the day, it was school. It was the bells too loud or rattly in broken speakers that would never get fixed. It was the bad floors squeaky and footprinted, and the bang of lockers. It was writing my name in the upper-right-hand corner of the paper or Mr. Nelson would automatically deduct five points, and in the upper left-hand-corner of the paper or Mr. Peter would deduct three. "Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler

High school is a strange existence. It is a minefield of cliques, relationships, and hopefully schoolwork. There are several authors who have found a sharply accurate voice when writing as teens, John Green being the most successful.

When it does ring true, scenes and exchanges strike with the power to take us back to our most vibrant adolescent memories. These are the books that hold this ability for me. They are great high school narratives dealing with isolation, cliques, peer-pressure, and simply trying to survive.

Thu, 07/23/2015 - 12:35pm
Boy + Bot by Ame Dyckman and illustrated by Dan Yaccarino

Boy + Bot are two very different friends who share the same love of discovery. Boy encounters the robot in the woods while collecting pinecones and asks to play. "Affirmative!" the robot answers.

Wed, 05/27/2015 - 1:40am
Locke & Key: Welcome to Lovecraft

Welcome to Keyhouse: an unlikely New England mansion in Lovecraft, Massachusetts that opens doors to transformations that no one would ever expect—especially the new owners, the mourning Locke family. After their father Rendell is murdered in California, the grieving Mrs. Locke moves herself and her three school-aged children—Tyler, Kinsey, and young Bode—across the country to live with distant family.

Tue, 05/26/2015 - 4:24pm
Ripped from the Headlines: Timely Fiction for Teens

Confession time: I am news junkie. Obsessed to the core with headlines, bylines, and editorials, I love starting my morning with a hot cup of coffee, a good podcast, and the online editions of my favorite papers.

Tue, 05/26/2015 - 1:39am
Dog Crazy by Meg Donohue

You will find wisdom and comfort in this sweet, funny, and smart story. Counselor Maggie Brennan specializes in helping her patients in a special type of loss: the anguish of the loss of a four-legged friend. Her insight into the loss of this special bond moves her grieving patients who are often embarrassed and confused about the emotional turmoil caused by the loss of their pets: loss is loss and love is love. Her patients are not “Dog Crazy” but “Dog Normal.”

Mon, 06/08/2015 - 11:29am

332 poems -- our largest number so far -- were submitted electronically by teens from our region. Amanda Rutstein, a poetry professor at the University of Mary Washington and manager of the Fredericksburg Writing Center, had the unenviable task of selecting only 24 winners. But how do you choose the best of the best when there are so very many entries? “I look for a variety of characteristics in a winning poem, but my top three are vivid imagery, use of figurative language, and ingenuity,” says Amanda. “It's fun to find the poems from students who took risks and the see the effort they put into those poems to make them shine...The ones who play with language always stand out.”

Winners will be awarded prizes and invited to read their work at the Teen Poetry Night at Headquarters Library, Wednesday, May 27 from 7:30-8:30. There will be a reception afterward, and the public is warmly invited to attend.

Congratulations to the winners of our 2015 Teen Poetry Contest!

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