LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
Tue, 01/25/2011 - 9:51am
Three Quarters Dead by Richard Peck

Kerry Williamson is 15 years old and suddenly has been selected by three of the most popular girls in school to be a part of their group.  In Richard Peck's book Three Quarters Dead, we meet Tanya, McKenzie, and Natalie, the three girls who rule the school and are the meanest girls around.  Kerry is surprised by this sudden attention from these three who previously ignored her.  They sit with her at lunch, they include her in their shopping expeditions, and she is invited to their party preparation meetings.  Tanya is clearly the ring leader of the group.  She is in charge of all the activities and the wardrobe decisions.  While at lunch with Tanya, Kerry begins to notice that time seems to stand still and lunch goes on much longer than it has in the past although the clock has not stopped.  There are several significant occurrences like this that Kerry notices but she is so happy to be part of the group that she ignores any signs that things may be weird.

Fri, 01/21/2011 - 2:38pm
The Atrium Gallery: The Students of Johnny Johnson's Workshop

Artwork by the students of Johnny Johnson's workshop is on display in the Headquarters Library Atrium Gallery and theater this January.

 See selected works below.
 

Graycliff Garden's Cat by Pat Knock

Graycliff Garden's Cat by Pat Knock
Acrylic on board, $200

Fri, 01/21/2011 - 11:03am
Janis Joplin: Rise Up Singing by Ann Angel

I am thrilled to share my first column with Caroline’s readers. Through the years, I have helped many of you find the titles Caroline recommended so I know how enthusiastically the column was embraced and will endeavor to continue her tradition of sharing great books for children of all ages. Luckily, children’s literature is in my blood. I began shelving books in the Headquarters Library children’s department while still in high school.

Thu, 01/20/2011 - 3:31am
The Long Winter

The constant beating of the winds against the house, the roaring, shrieking, howling of the storm, made it hard even to think. It was possible only to wait for the storm to stop. All the time, while they ground wheat, twisted hay, kept the fire burning in the stove, and huddled over it to thaw their chapped, numb hands and their itching, burning, chilblained feet, and while they chewed and swallowed the coarse bread, they were all waiting until the storm stopped.

It did not stop during the third day or the third night. In the fourth morning it was still blowing fiercely.
“No sign of a letup,” Pa said when he came in from the stable. “This is the worst yet.”
 
On the television series Little House on the Prairie, the sun is almost always shining—not surprising since it was filmed in Simi Valley, California. On television, the weather was hardly ever a problem. The TV stories are usually about how people interact with each other. But in the books, the Ingalls family was up against much more than that mean Nellie Oleson. The Long Winter of 1880-1881 begins with family on their South Dakota homestead, bringing in the hay crop on a lazy August day when all seems well.
Thu, 01/20/2011 - 1:08pm

Attorney and author Scott Turow is the writer of eleven works of fiction and nonfiction, including the bestselling Presumed Innocent and its sequel, Innocent. Mr. Turow will be speaking at the Fredericksburg Forum at the University of Mary Washington on March 17, 2011. Read on for information about the author and an annotated list of selected readalikes you might enjoy. For more information on Fredericksburg Forum lecture, visit http://www.umw.edu/forum/.

Tue, 07/21/2015 - 8:02pm
One Amazing Thing by C. B. Divakaruni

Do you ever wonder how you might react under extreme duress? Would you rise to the occasion and become an example to those struggling around you or would you withdraw and cower in fear? In One Amazing Thing by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, nine everyday men and women are put to that exact test as their lives change over the course of one disastrous event.

In advance of a planned trip to India, the above-mentioned people—most solo, but several in pairs—have all chosen this day to go to the consulate in California to obtain a travel visa. As with many bureaucratic departments, the wait is interminable. Graduate student Uma is preparing to visit her parents who have recently moved back to India. In her irritation with the long delay, she ignores the first slight rumble. The second quake, however, rips apart what was only seconds earlier a solid building.

Tue, 01/18/2011 - 3:15pm

This interview airs beginning January 19.
Jack Edlund has been slowly uncovering the secrets of Fredericksburg’s Old Stone Warehouse. He is also a collector of old and interesting artifacts and an artist. Jack talks about his dedication to discovery and digging in the dirt to learn about the past.

Tue, 01/18/2011 - 9:29am
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Alternating from biography to science, Rebecca Skloot in writing The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks avoids sentimentality and making judgments.

Skloot, a science journalist, tells the story of Henrietta and her DNA.  The subject was born Loretta Pleasant—nobody knows how her name became Henrietta—Lacks, in a family known to marry their first cousins in the now-razed town of slave cabins and tobacco farms named Clover near Roanoke, Virginia. She married her first cousin, David ‘Day’ Lacks, moved to Baltimore to work in a plant riddled with asbestos.  Her husband's  unfaithfulness gave her both neurosyphilis and gonorrhea. Her environment, poverty and lack of education made her the tragic heroine of a great scientific experiment. Henrietta Lack's deadly cervical cancer cells—taken without her consent—were the first to be grown and then thrive in a lab. HeLa cells, still growing today sixty years after her death, would weigh in total more than 50 metric tons.

Tue, 01/18/2011 - 11:04am
Art Film - The Great Artists 2: Durer, Michelangelo, Raphael

Another year of great art films begins tomorrow night, Tuesday, January 18, at Headquarters with a sceening of The Great Artists 2: Durer, Michelangelo, Raphael. In separate episodes, art historian Tim Marlow explores the lives and works of Dürer, Michelangelo, and Raphael. Filming takes place throughout the world..

Films are shown each month in the Headquarters Library theater at 7pm. See the full 2011 line-up.

Mon, 01/17/2011 - 12:48pm
Joe Hill

You can tell a book by its cover.  So, if a book’s cover or title “calls” to you, it's karma - pick it up! A couple of years ago I was in the library and a book by a debut author was in display. The Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill was definitely calling to me. I thought, “Who is this Joe Hill? I don’t know him and maybe his book isn’t good.”
A couple of weeks later a patron came into my office and asked me, “Have you ever read anything by Joe Hill?”
        “No. Why? Is he good?” I asked.
        “Well, you know that he is Stephen King’s son. I wanted to see if he writes like his father.” 
         Now I am kicking myself mentally!  I should have listened to the book calling me! I ran to the display and thankfully it was still there!

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