LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
Tue, 03/09/2010 - 10:25am

Absurd, baroque, neorealism, surreal, and bizarre are all used to describe Federico Fellini’s film style, but none of them quite capture the true essence of his films. His famous and unique style of storytelling, which was largely autobiographical, blended reality and fantasy and was so distinct that it became known as Felliniesque.

Wed, 03/03/2010 - 4:21pm

    Some books seem to fly under the radar.  They don’t garner the big awards or make the bestseller lists, they’re just quietly checked out of libraries over and over again.  One of my new favorites in this category is “The Thumb in the Box” by Ken Roberts.


    It begins, “This is a story about a fire truck being driven into the ocean and two people taking off their thumbs.  Don’t worry, though.  Nobody gets hurt.”  No self-respecting third grade audience will let you stop reading after that!

Fri, 12/17/2010 - 2:37pm

Thirty-eight students in grades 9-12 from Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Stafford and Westmoreland county particpated in this year's show.  The talent is immense, the art is phenomenal and difficult choices were made.  Local artist, Johnny Johnson, generously donated his time to judge the grades 11 and 12 contestants.  Those artists experienced the other side of an art show and were the judges for those in grades 9-10. 

 

Best in Show was awarded to senior, Katy Shepard for "Roman Myths of Love" (shown above)

Wed, 03/10/2010 - 10:25am

She was one of the world's most famous chefs, but in her long life she had also been a high school basketball player and top secret researcher, as well as making appearances on TV shows ranging from her own myriad cooking series to The Cosby Show to Sesame Street to a beloved parody on Saturday Night Live. She was as much a cultural institution as a culinary artist.

Wed, 02/24/2010 - 4:04pm

    The gold medals get all the attention at the Olympics, but winners of the silver and bronze medals are proud, too.  So it goes with children’s book awards as well.  Anyone would be thrilled to win the Newbery or Caldecott Medals, but earning an Honor (as the runners-up are called) is nothing to sneeze at.


    This year’s honor books – and yes, they earn a silver medal – include one of those fascinating true stories that makes readers say, “how come I never knew that?”

 

Mon, 10/31/2016 - 8:57am

No discussion of twentieth-century science fiction writing can be complete without mention of Isaac Asimov, the biochemistry professor and visionary writer who was responsible for creating the popular characterization of robots and incorporating themes of social science into “hard” science fiction. His most popular works, the Foundation trilogy and the I, Robot series, are considered landmarks of science fiction to this day. 

Tue, 02/23/2010 - 1:33pm

    What did you read during the Snownami/Snowpalooza/Snowmageddon?  Judging by the armloads of books people were checking out from the library before each of the storms, the most popular items were picture books, mysteries, best sellers, historical fiction, biographies… in fact, people were, as usual, reading everything!


    Among those armloads were plenty of graphic novels for young readers.  Defined as novels with complex storylines told in the form of a comic book, these books are finding increasing recognition in the form of awards.

Fri, 02/19/2010 - 4:10pm

Paintings by Edward Russell are on display in the Atrium Gallery through February.

The paintings in this exhibit were rendered in watercolor and gouache. Most of the scenes were found near Fredericksburg. Other locations include Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Montana.

Mr. Russell retired from the US Government in 1983 after serving thirty three years as Director-Curator, US Army Engineer Museum, Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

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