Teen Poetry Night: May 19
Fine Free Week & National Library Week: April 13-19
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
2014 Great Lives Chappell Lecture series
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Teen Poetry Night: May 19
Fine Free Week & National Library Week: April 13-19
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
2014 Great Lives Chappell Lecture series
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.

LibraryPoint Blog

03/12/2014 - 8:08am
You Don't Know Me But You Don't Like Me by Nathan Rabin

You Don't Know Me But You Don't Like Me documents Nathan Rabin's journey into two vastly different but equally mocked musical fan bases. Phish and Insane Clown Posse are about as far away as you can get from each other in terms of sound, lyrics, and subject matter. The one thing that they do have in common is that their fans have very few qualms about conscious-altering substances.

That's how Rabin finds his ticket in. He's been going through some issues lately—actually he's been going through issues his whole life. Lower-class with a foster-home upbringing, Rabin managed to carve a niche for himself in Chicago writing for the A.V. Club, a cultural review publication that belongs to The Onion. Despite that success, it certainly cannot help to be diagnosed bipolar, which is exactly what happened to Rabin on his journey.

03/11/2014 - 1:08pm
Battle Bunny by Jon Scieszka

It is vital for early elementary aged children to read introductory chapter books that they enjoy.  Reading is fun, but when you’re just learning sometimes you need encouragement that the hard work is worth it!   Even if your young person isn’t ready to tackle the following books independently, they are great read alouds that you both will enjoy while reinforcing the message that--you guessed it--reading is fun!

03/11/2014 - 3:03am
The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert

What I’m about to say will be blasphemy to many of you. I DIDN’T like…no, actually, I hated Elizabeth’s Gilbert best-selling book Eat, Pray, Love. BUT, before you vow to never again read one of my blog posts, let me quickly assure you that I wholeheartedly embrace her latest epic offering, The Signature of All Things.

Englishman Henry Whittaker was born into a dirt-poor family. By combining an innate entrepreneurial spirit with an equally impressive knowledge of botany, Whittaker succeeds in amassing an early fortune. He and his Dutch-born wife move to Philadelphia where they build an opulent estate, and Henry assumes a position as one of America’s richest men.