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Community Survey
Stafford 350
Learn fast with Mango Languages
eBooks - we've got 'em
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Local Authors
Community Survey
Stafford 350
Learn fast with Mango Languages
eBooks - we've got 'em
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Local Authors

LibraryPoint Blog

08/07/2012 - 2:26pm
Mountain Mack

This interview airs beginning Wednesday, August 8.
“Mountain” Mack and Joan Swift tell tales in tandem.  Join these delightful storytellers as they meet with Debby Klein to talk about their years of experience and entertain us with a popular Jack Tale on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production. (Originally filmed in 2003.)

08/07/2012 - 12:40pm
BEST IN SHOW: Lauren Smith - Walk on Caroline Street

We had a great turnout at Headquarters Library for the opening reception of Uniquely Fredericksburg 2012 on Friday, August 3.  Be sure to stop by before the end of September to see the show.

Get a glimpse with these award-winning works, or see these works on Flickr.

See the list of winners below.

BEST IN SHOW
Lauren Smith - Walk on Caroline Street

08/07/2012 - 5:26am
Redshirts by John Scalzi

Oh, John Scalzi, how I love you (~swoons~).  Your likeable characters, intricate but uncomplicated plots, your passion for science fiction. . .   you COMPLETE me.  And your latest offering, Redshirts, does not disappoint.  I knew the moment I read the title oh, so many months ago, that the Trekkie in me would melt at the book's first words.  I was not mistaken.  

Growing up in a military family, Star Trek's flaws were constantly pointed out to me.  That preposterous notion that the entire senior staff would be sent time and again on dangerous missions with no one with any real command experience left in charge.  I didn't care.  Star Trek was cool, like bow ties, fezes, and Stetsons.  But I'm ashamed to say I never did notice the disturbingly high mortality rate of the red-shirted junior officer on away missions.  It wasn't until years later that I heard the term "redshirt" that it occurred to me, oh yeah, those guys were always toast, weren't they?  Still, I never really gave them much thought, save for when I heard someone use the term I could go "Hey, I understood that reference! Yeah, those guys died, like, A LOT, didn't they?"