Music on the Steps: August 25 - Marenje Marimba Ensemble
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Believe Write Share Community Gathering: Tuesday, August 26
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Sign up NOW for summer reading!
Stafford 350
Music on the Steps: August 25 - Marenje Marimba Ensemble
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Believe Write Share Community Gathering: Tuesday, August 26
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Sign up NOW for summer reading!
Stafford 350

LibraryPoint Blog

03/27/2012 - 3:31am
Believing Is Seeing: Observations on the Mysteries of Photography by Errol Morri

“Our beliefs do not determine what is true or false. They do not determine objective reality. But they do determine what we see.”

In Believing Is Seeing, Errol Morris investigates the complex relationship between documentary photographs and the truth we assume they deliver. Best known as the gifted documentarian behind films such as The Fog of War, Standard Operating Procedure, and The Thin Blue Line, Morris has spent years pondering how authenticity, truth, and appearance converge and complicate one another. It is hardly surprising then that Morris’s analysis of documentary photography is insightful and accessible.

Errol Morris’s cinematic explorations often fixate on a specific figure or series of events. He then breathes life into the topic by artfully combining provocative interviews and extensive research. Believing is Seeing successfully incorporates this methodology while simultaneously deconstructing the very notion of documentary veracity. The book consists of essays, each one describing a case study in which documentary photographs created controversy, conflicting interpretations, or troubling implications. Morris elucidates both the context and reception of each image with interviews and archival research.

He also analyzes both contemporary and historical images, demonstrating that many of the same issues and questions have been recurring since the advent of photography. Whether the photograph was taken in 1855 during the Crimean War or in 2003 at Abu Ghraib, our collective tendency to equate an image with a finalized truth has been problematic. To borrow Morris’s succinct phrasing, “…photographs allow us to think we know more than we really do. We can imagine a context that isn’t really there.”

03/27/2012 - 3:31am
Robert Green, Chief of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe

This interview airs beginning Wednesday, March 28.
The Patawomeck Indians played an important role during the clash over the first Virginia settlement at Jamestown. Robert Green, the 21st century Patawomeck Chief, talks to Debby Klein about his work to preserve the rich lineage of his tribe on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

03/26/2012 - 4:07pm
Great Lives Lecture Series: Sherlock Holmes

The University of Mary Washington's 2012 Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series continues on Tuesday, March 27, with a lecture on Sherlock Holmes by Jeremy Black, author of London: A History.

The game’s afoot when British historian and professor of history at the University of Exeter Jeremy Black elucidates the scintillating mind of Sherlock Holmes; the tenebrous character of Dr. Moriarty; and the rather obtuse Dr. Watson, who chronicled Holmes’ adventures. Professor Black analyzes Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous character and the escapades that emanated from Holmes’ digs at 221B, where it is always 1895 in London.   Black is the author of more than 100 books on European (and especially British) history, including London: A History.  He has previously given highly popular Great Lives lectures on figures ranging from George III and Napoleon to James Bond.

All lectures in the university's Great Lives series are free and open to the public.

For more about the life of Sherlock Holmes check out these resources from the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.