Holiday Closing: All branches will be closed on Sunday, April 20, for Easter. You can still access our catalog, eBooks, and research tools.
Teen Poetry Night: May 19
Fine Free Week & National Library Week: April 13-19
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
2014 Great Lives Chappell Lecture series
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Teen Poetry Night: May 19
Fine Free Week & National Library Week: April 13-19
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
2014 Great Lives Chappell Lecture series
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.

LibraryPoint Blog

12/13/2011 - 12:51pm
The Scent of Rain and Lightning by Nancy Pickard

When Jodi Linder was three, the unbearable happened.  As told in Nancy Pickard's The Scent of Rain and Lightning, one Saturday night, her father was murdered and her mother disappeared.  Jodi grew up in the small town of Rose, Kansas, wrapped in the fierce protective circle of her three uncles, safe and cherished, but distrustful of happiness.

When Jodi Linder was 26, the unthinkable happened. Billy Crosby, the man convicted of killing her father, has been released from prison and returns to Rose, loudly protesting his innocence of the murder.  In a small town, it’s hard to keep your distance from anyone, and Jodi finds that she starts to run into Billy’s son Collin just about everywhere.  Collin is a lawyer who wants to live peacefully in Rose and wants to prove his father’s innocence.

12/12/2011 - 12:10pm
Charles McDaniel

This interview airs beginning Wednesday, December 14.
Charles McDaniel is easily recognized as the president and CEO of the Hilldrup Companies, but he is also outstanding as a community leader in historic preservation. His meticulously restored 18th century home, the Sentry Box, is a magnificent example of his continuous effort to assure that attention and care will be given to remnants of our vital past. Debby Klein learns more when she visits him on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

12/12/2011 - 4:30am
Phineas Gage: A Gruesome But True Story About Brain Science

Phineas Gage was truly a man with a hole in his head.  Phineas, a railroad construction foreman, was blasting rock near Cavendish, Vermont, in 1848 when a thirteen-pound iron rod was shot through his brain.  Miraculously, he survived to live another eleven years and become a textbook case in brain science.  

What an amazing story!  The pictures and illustrations add to the narrative, and the cover photograph of his skull is very thought-provoking.  Phineas Gage: A Gruesome But True Story, by John Fleischman, approaches Phineas’s life after the accident from a scientific and psychological viewpoint. Fleischman includes interviews with people who knew Gage before his accident as well as after and observed the changes in his behavior.  The author also presents notes from the doctors who treated him over the eleven years following his accident. It is an amazing story of survival and the resilience of the human brain. Who would have thought that anyone could have survived even a little while--let alone talk, walk and function after such an event?