Teen Poetry Night: May 19
Fine Free Week & National Library Week: April 13-19
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
2014 Great Lives Chappell Lecture series
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Teen Poetry Night: May 19
Fine Free Week & National Library Week: April 13-19
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
2014 Great Lives Chappell Lecture series
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.

LibraryPoint Blog

10/18/2011 - 8:33am
Steve Watkins

In celebration of Teen Read Week, the Salem Church Library's OurSpace teens are hosting local author Steve Watkins, this Wednesday, October 19th, from 4:30-5:30. Join us for a fun, informal discussion about authorship, publishing, YA literature, and his celebrated books, Down Sand Mountain, and What Comes After.

To read more about Steve Watkins, visit his blog at http://watkins.elsweb.org/.

Hope to see you there!

10/18/2011 - 3:30am
Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever

Join Jeff Kinney, author of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, at the Headquarters Library Thursday, November 17, from 9:00-10:00.

He'll be here to talk about his new book Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever.

Autographed books must be ordered and purchased in advance by calling Jabberwocky Books at 540-371-5684. Mr Kinney will not be available to sign books at this event.

Sign up begins November 1st. Call 540-372-1144 to register. Space is limited.

Want to read more books like Diary of a Wimpy Kid? Check out our Wimpy Kid book match for kids and for teens.

10/18/2011 - 3:30am
Dear American Airlines

Most people know what it feels like to be stuck in limbo somewhere between departure and destination. Even if your journey was perfectly planned, there are so many things that can easily go awry and impede your progress. In Dear American Airlines, that agonizing stasis is symptomatic of much more than an airline’s incompetence or a missed connection. It characterizes the 53 years that Benjamin R. Ford has been living and drawing breath.

While en route from New York to Los Angeles, Bennie’s flight is abruptly canceled. Even though the sky is bright and the clouds look picturesque, rather than ominous, American Airlines claims foul weather has interfered with the scheduled flight. As a consequence, Bennie finds himself trapped in Chicago’s O’Hare airport with no way out. But he does have a pen, some paper, and the desire to complain to American Airlines.

The entirety of Jonathan Miles’s poignant and humorous novel is written in the form of a letter of complaint. At first, Bennie’s explicit goal is to write and get his ticket refunded. As the letter progresses, however, it becomes quite clear that a check from American Airlines will not resolve Bennie’s existential crisis.