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Community Survey
Stafford 350
Learn fast with Mango Languages
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Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Local Authors
Community Survey
Stafford 350
Learn fast with Mango Languages
eBooks - we've got 'em
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Local Authors

LibraryPoint Blog

12/28/2010 - 3:31am

Gaius Petrius Ruso has just arrived for duty in the Britain, a far backwater of the Roman Empire. He’s been assigned to the Valeria Victrix Legion as Medicus, serving the legion and the natives living in the town surrounding the barracks. When the only other doctor on staff is poisoned by a plate of oysters at the local bar/bordello, Ruso works on alone. Tramping the town in an exhausted stupor, he encounters an odious merchant beating an unconscious slave girl—who clearly has a badly broken arm.

Ruso wants to forget he ever saw the girl. He doesn’t have the money to buy her. He has no use for her. But it’s clear that if she stays as she is, she’ll die. So Ruso does buy her, with the plan to heal her and put her to work.  But pretty and clever Tilla has other plans. As a point of honor, she wants to die, and there’s very little Ruso can do about it as she has no plans to tell him.
12/27/2010 - 10:37am

As a tremendous beach fan I find myself growing sad as the winter approaches. One place that I have always wanted to go, but have unfortunately never been is Key West, located at the southern most point of the Keys in Florida and known for its beautiful blue waters and white beaches, flowers, tamarind trees, guava trees, and coconut palms.

Even though he was an international jetsetter, Ernest Hemingway fell in love with Key West and called it his home for ten years. While he was there, he wrote A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Death in the Afternoon, and To Have and Have Not. Hemingway said that it was like being in a different country while still being in the United States. As he wrote, he had his beloved 6-toed or polydactyl cats around him. His home there has been preserved as a historical attraction which still cares for the cats.
 

12/27/2010 - 3:31am

Banished from their small village, three small, bald cousins aimlessly wander in the desert. The one with a star on his shirt is greedy and sneaky. The tallest one is jolly but dim-witted. The quietest one is a hero in the making, though he doesn’t know that yet. They quickly become separated and when they reunite they are wrapped up in the beginnings of a brutal war involving humans, dragons, and a frightening race of giant rat-creatures…stupid stupid rat creatures.

Jeff Smith’s graphic novel series Bone manages to combine the look and humor of Disney cartoons while tackling the sort of epic adventure that one might find in J.R.R. Tolkien or C.S. Lewis.

Fone Bone, our hero, and his cousins owe their looks to early Disney characters, particularly the work of Carl Barks, who created Scrooge McDuck comics and revolutionized the drawing style of Donald Duck for the company. Recognizing Barks’ influence baffled me at first. Donald was not someone’s subject to be reformed and retooled. Similar to Athena, he sprung forth from Walt Disney’s head, already wearing his sailor suit…without the pants. Right?
 
Apparently not. Just like those famous ducks, the Bone cousins have large heads, round bellies, low centers of gravity, and the same aversion to pants. All of this might make it hard for a reader to take their epic quest seriously, but Smith valiantly strikes at the importance of their mission.