The Porter branch will be closed Saturday, August 30 through Thursday, September 4, for roof repairs. To make this easy for our customers the CRRL will not be charging fines from August 30 through September 6. See details on the Porter branch page.
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Cafe Book 2013-2014: See what we're reading this year!
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Cafe Book 2013-2014: See what we're reading this year!

LibraryPoint Blog

09/23/2010 - 2:07pm

          Before you take your children to pick pumpkins or enjoy a hayride this fall, be sure to check out picture books showcasing farm life.

          Elisha Cooper’s “Farm” focuses on the farm family as much as on their daily work.   The two farmers and their two children plus a house, two barns, four silos and lots more make up a farm where feed corn is the main crop.
Tractors rumble back and forth on the bare dirt in early spring, March brings mud, and later the children plant tomatoes and carrots. The children have other chores, too, of course: feeding the cattle (the girl) and the chickens (the boy). Summer brings heat, and fall brings the harvest, with the farmer in his combine checking the corn’s yield on his computer and talking with other farmers on his cell phone. 
 
09/23/2010 - 9:08am

My paperback copies of Ray Bradbury's wonderful fantasy collections--The Illustrated Man, October Country, Dandelion Wine, The Machineries of Joy, and The Martian Chronicles--are in sad shape. The pages are brittle, yellowed, and, yes, a bit musty. But I keep them because his lyrical words matchlessly probe humanity at its worst and best. When friends of mine gifted us with 100 of His Most Celebrated Tales one Christmas, I was happy to have many of those beautiful stories collected together in a hardback edition to last for years--and so was the local library for we own several copies of it.

I certainly won't go through every one of the one hundred, but I'll mention several pieces that stuck with me time and again. One of the first stories in the collection is "The Rocket," in which a poor junk man gets hold of a prototype rocketship and dreams of somehow going into space with his family. "The Sailor Home from the Sea" is a tale of loss and love and the imagination to reconcile them. "The Sound of Summer Running" is the opening piece for Dandelion Wine, and it brings back the time of year and the time of life for one young man who feels as if his whole town might capsize, go under, leaving not a trace in the clover and weeds of burgeoning summer.

09/22/2010 - 1:57pm

It happens all the time. You’re sitting in the movie theater with your friends, waiting for the show to start. The screen goes green with a preview message, then suddenly blasts alive with a trailer for an upcoming movie. It’s all over in less than a minute, but you know by that time that either a)you have to see it and are already mentally marking your calendar for the release date, or b) it looks like another lame romantic comedy/action-thriller/horror flick you’ve seen a hundred times before and you’re not wasting your money on that.

But what if you had the chance to tell the story? Oftentimes, a good trailer can make even a lame movie seem pretty appealing. People across the country, especially teens, are being given the chance to do just that, but for books through book trailer contests. And, because so many books are being turned into movies these days, it’s easy to find creative fodder for the aspiring teen film directors out there.