Music on the Steps: August 25 - Marenje Marimba Ensemble
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Believe Write Share Community Gathering: Tuesday, August 26
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Sign up NOW for summer reading!
Stafford 350
Music on the Steps: August 25 - Marenje Marimba Ensemble
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Believe Write Share Community Gathering: Tuesday, August 26
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Sign up NOW for summer reading!
Stafford 350

LibraryPoint Blog

08/12/2010 - 9:57am

The late Philip K. Dick's works were one of the strongest influences on science fiction writers in the first decade of the 21st century, including the fields of alternate history and paranoid thrillers.

08/11/2010 - 2:18pm

We want to see your vacation pics! Post a picture on our Facebook wall between August 1-31 of you & your library book (or video, cd, etc.) on your vacation (or staycation). A random winner will be chosen to receive a CRRL t-shirt. The winner will be announced September 1.
Have fun and be creative!

08/11/2010 - 8:46am

For science fiction aficionados, the premise of WWW: Wake by Robert J. Sawyer initially sounds, well, perhaps a bit contrived (even beyond the normal contrivances of science fiction).  But keep reading: the protagonist, Caitlin Dector, is a young blind millennial who has never known a world without the Internet, a world she can navigate with ease through the use of assistive technologies.  Caitlin becomes the subject of an experimental procedure to restore sight.  However, when her vision is "switched on" she does not see the physical world, but an abstract representation of the World Wide Web.  While exploring her strange new ability, she discovers a growing intelligence emerging from within the Web . . .   see what I mean?  My first thought after hearing this description was, "That sounds like the plot of a bad 90s Outer Limits episode."  After cracking the book open however, I found WWW: Wake tells a fascinating story, blending the best of both science fiction and hard science as well as cyberculture, blind culture, information theory, epidemiology, world politics, family dynamics, pedagogical theory, teenage culture, and probably a few other things I'm not thinking of.  All of that in one book.  And it's really, really good.