Read for the Record: Tuesday, October 21
Friends of the Library Book Sale at HQ
Big Library Read: Anatomy of a Misfit by Andrea Portes, October 13-28
Halloween Fun: Celebrations for babies - grade 6
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Stafford 350
Read for the Record: Tuesday, October 21
Friends of the Library Book Sale at HQ
Big Library Read: Anatomy of a Misfit by Andrea Portes, October 13-28
Halloween Fun: Celebrations for babies - grade 6
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Stafford 350

LibraryPoint Blog

09/16/2010 - 1:36pm

Film noir is not easily defined. The actual words come from French and mean "black cinema." It was in France during the post-war years that the term was used to describe a certain set of Hollywood films that were saturated with a darkness and cynicism that was not seen before. These movies included The Maltese Falcon (1941), Double Indemnity (1944), Laura (1944), and Murder, My Sweet (1944).

09/16/2010 - 3:40pm

    It’s no fair, Isabel complains, that the porcupines don’t get to have balloons at their class’s Graduation Day, as the raccoons, possums and other animals do.  But balloons are not safe around the porcupines’ prickly quills, Isabel’s porcupine teacher gently explains.  The porcupines will get bookmarks instead.


    Isabel and her friend Walter are not happy.  “I heard that after a few days a balloon floats halfway between the ceiling and the floor…it just hangs there like a ghost,” Walter says longingly. So Isabel makes a plan to do something about it in Deborah Underwood’s new picture book, “A Balloon for Isabel.”    

09/16/2010 - 10:41am

 As The Strange Case of Origami Yoda begins, Tommy has two questions and two questions only. Those questions?  Is Origami Yoda for real? Not real as in he exists, but for real as in can this seemingly wise finger puppet predict the future? And secondly, is the advice Yoda has given Tommy (despite Origami Yoda being voiced by Dwight, the strangest kid in school) good advice or will it result in school wide humiliation? With these two questions in mind, Tommy begins a case study of the Origami Yoda - how he got his start, the kid behind it, and all the situations in which Yoda has been used for aid at McQuarrie Middle School. 

The book has cool illustrations and little details throughout – think Diary of a Wimpy Kid format – and they really capture the personalities of the characters in the book. There are more than a few funny Star Wars references that fans will delight in as well.   The writing and story really drew me in because the reader is able to ponder each situation and draw his or her own conclusion on the wisdom being dispatched by Origami Yoda. The author, Tom Angleberger, has captured the unique personalities and challenges faced by the middle-school crowd in a realistic and humorous way.