Music on the Steps: August 25 - Marenje Marimba Ensemble
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Believe Write Share Community Gathering: Tuesday, August 26
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Sign up NOW for summer reading!
Stafford 350
Music on the Steps: August 25 - Marenje Marimba Ensemble
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Believe Write Share Community Gathering: Tuesday, August 26
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Sign up NOW for summer reading!
Stafford 350

LibraryPoint Blog

03/09/2010 - 11:25am

Absurd, baroque, neorealism, surreal, and bizarre are all used to describe Federico Fellini’s film style, but none of them quite capture the true essence of his films. His famous and unique style of storytelling, which was largely autobiographical, blended reality and fantasy and was so distinct that it became known as Felliniesque.

03/03/2010 - 5:21pm

    Some books seem to fly under the radar.  They don’t garner the big awards or make the bestseller lists, they’re just quietly checked out of libraries over and over again.  One of my new favorites in this category is “The Thumb in the Box” by Ken Roberts.


    It begins, “This is a story about a fire truck being driven into the ocean and two people taking off their thumbs.  Don’t worry, though.  Nobody gets hurt.”  No self-respecting third grade audience will let you stop reading after that!

03/03/2010 - 4:42pm

Come join the Rappahannock Film Club and the Central Rappahannock Library as we present Michael Haneke's Caché at the Headquarters Library on Thursday, March 4th at 7:00 pm.

This unsettling drama is a tour de force showcase for Haneke's unparalled ability to inspire fear and paranoia in both his actors and his audience. Renowned French actors Daniel Auteuil and Juliette Binoche play a married couple whose lives begin to crumble when mysterious (and sinister) videotapes start to appear on their doorstep. Even more terrifying, Auteuil slowly pieces together that it may be related to a terrible secret from his past. Taut, tense and electrifying, Caché is deeply disturbing and endlessly fascinating.