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Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
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Cafe Book 2013-2014: See what we're reading this year!
Uniquely Stafford Call for Artists: Deadline September 26
Learn fast with Mango Languages
Stafford 350
eBooks - we've got 'em
Digital magazines from Zinio. Back issues available.
Cafe Book 2013-2014: See what we're reading this year!

LibraryPoint Blog

12/06/2013 - 4:03am
If you like The Sea by John Banville

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

The Sea by John Banville: "'I have carried the memory of that moment through a whole half century, as if it were the emblem of something final, precious and irretrievable,' says the narrator of Banville's Booker Prize-winning novel of a relatively trivial moment. But when he recalls the mother and daughter whom he first loved as a barely pubescent child-whose presence pulled him out of the shadow of his paltry self-he observes, 'The two figures in the scene, I mean Chloe and her mother, are all my own work.' Memory, then, is the subject of this brief but magisterial work, a condensed teardrop of a novel that captures perfectly the essence of irretrievable longing. After the death of his wife, Max has retreated to the seashore where he spent his childhood summers, staying at an inn that was once the home of a magnificent, careless family called the Graces. It's as if reawakening the pain of his first, terrible loss-that high-strung and volatile Chloe-will ease his more recent loss." (Library Journal)

"I have carried the memory of that moment through a whole half century, as if it were the emblem of something final, precious and irretrievable," says the narrator of Banville's Booker Prize-winning novel of a relatively trivial moment. But when he recalls the mother and daughter whom he first loved as a barely pubescent child-whose presence pulled him out of the shadow of his paltry self-he observes, "The two figures in the scene, I mean Chloe and her mother, are all my own work." Memory, then, is the subject of this brief but magisterial work, a condensed teardrop of a novel that captures perfectly the essence of irretrievable longing. After the death of his wife, Max has retreated to the seashore where he spent his childhood summers, staying at an inn that was once the home of a magnificent, careless family called the Graces. It's as if reawakening the pain of his first, terrible loss-that high-strung and volatile Chloe-will ease his more recent loss. - See more at: http://librarypoint.bibliocommons.com/item/show/499827072_the_sea#sthash.Cczj1kO3.dpuf

If you enjoyed this title, here are some other titles you may enjoy:

Atonement by Ian McEwan
On a summer day in 1935, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment's flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant. But Briony's incomplete grasp of adult motives and her precocious imagination bring about a crime that will change all their lives.

 

 

The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Prince Myshkin, a good yet simple man, is out of place in the corrupt world created by Russia's ruling class.

 

 

12/05/2013 - 4:37pm
Census Data for Small Businesses and Entrepreneurs Webinar

Find the data to support your business plan, research your industry, target your clients, and more, using the Census Bureau website to mine the data collected about household consumers, businesses, and the economy.

The webinar is on Tuesday, December 10, 2013, from 1:00pm to 2:30pm.  You can attend this free webinar at a library branch close to you or you can log on at work or at home. Need more information?  Please call Mary Buck at 540-659-4909.

12/05/2013 - 3:16pm
Teen Books into Movies

There are two approaches when it comes to reading books destined for the big screen.  Some like to read the book first, and others, like me, don’t.  My initial excitement in seeing Harry Potter brought to life, ended in disappointment.  Due to the constraints of the format, I knew they would have to leave much on the cutting room floor, but for me those fallen scenes were the most important.  In comparison, “The Hunger Games” is one of my favorite teen book to movie renditions, but even they soft-pedaled one of the most emotionally charged parts of the book--the genetically engineered, shockingly horrific mutts--probably and understandably for that PG-13 rating.  These days though, so much young adult fiction is Hollywood-bound that I read the book before I know its future.