Reading Room Blog

05/13/2009 - 1:08pm

          Poetry books are well represented on library shelves and eagerly checked out by readers raised on Shel Silverstein and Dr. Seuss. Fans of their humor and wordplay will love Adam Rex’s two monstrous poetry collections, “Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich” and the brand-new ”Frankenstein Takes the Cake.” Each book features poems about famous monsters – Dracula, the Phantom of the Opera, Bigfoot – and their trials and tribulations. 

05/04/2009 - 3:32pm

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

To commemorate Mother's Day, here's a lovely poem by David Wojahn of Virginia, remembering his mother after forty years.

Walking to School, 1964

Blurring the window, the snowflakes' numb white lanterns.
She's brewed her coffee, in the bathroom sprays cologne
And sets her lipstick upright on the sink.
The door ajar, I glimpse the yellow slip,

The rose-colored birthmark on her shoulder.
Then she's dressed—the pillbox hat and ersatz fur,

04/27/2009 - 11:57am

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

Sometimes I wonder at my wife's forbearance. She's heard me tell the same stories dozens of times, and she still politely laughs when she should. Here's a poem by Susan Browne, of California, that treats an oft-told story with great tenderness.

On Our Eleventh Anniversary

You're telling that story again about your childhood,
when you were five years old and rode your blue bicycle

from Copenhagen to Espergaerde, and it was night
and snowing by the time you arrived,

04/22/2009 - 11:26am

American Life in Poetry: Column 213

BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

Bill Holm, one of the most intelligent and engaging writers of our northern plains, died on February 25th. He will be greatly missed. He and I were of the same generation and we shared the same sense of wonder, amusement, and skepticism about the course of technology. I don't yet own an Earbud, but I won't need to, now that we have Bill's poem.

Earbud

06/16/2009 - 12:17pm

If you liked the "Harry Potter" series for the believable way the magic elements are handled, for the glorious escapism, and for their appeal to girls, you may enjoy these titles:

"Olivia Kidney" by Ellen Potter
12-year old Olivia gets locked out of her apartment and spends the evening searching for her father, the building's superintendent. Her encounters with the strange occupants of the building help her to resolve the problems in her life.

"The Trolls" by Polly Horvath

04/27/2009 - 9:14am

The Week of the Young Child, running now through Saturday, celebrates wee ones as well as their parents and caregivers.  Hats off to all the child care providers, nursery school teachers, parents and grandparents who nurture and educate our youngest citizens!

 

04/20/2009 - 5:08pm

 If you like Sahara by Clive Cussler, you might also enjoy these titles and authors.

The Last Oracle by James Rollins

An ancient relic, a murdered man, an international think tank of scientists known as the Jasons who have discovered a way to bioengineer autistic children, and a plot to wipe out a quarter of the world's population have two men racing against time to solve a mystery that dates back to the first famous oracle of history--the Greek Oracle of Delphi.  (Catalog summary)


The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy

04/15/2009 - 11:36am

Hello! If you enjoyed “Bones of the Moon” by Jonathan Carroll for its character and for the magical, fantastical things that happen, you may enjoy these works:

The Limits of Enchantment
by Graham Joyce

04/15/2009 - 11:05am

 Check the back seat of the car and under the bed – it’s Food for Fines Week, and that means you can return your overdue library books and do a good deed at the same time. Through next Sunday, for every canned good or non-perishable item that you bring to any branch of the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, we'll deduct a dollar from your overdue fines, up to a maximum amount of $10.00. All contributions go to local food banks.

          While you’re at the library, be sure to take a look at the exhibits. This month at the Headquarters Library, matchbox cars from the collection of Jeremy Harrison fill the second floor exhibit case. Dozens of brightly painted metal cars are set up in and around a garage, complete with service bays, ramps and even a heliport. 

          After your children have had their fill of the exhibit, be sure to check out a few books for young auto enthusiasts.

01/26/2010 - 10:39am

On April 15, 1912 the British luxury liner RMS Titanic struck an iceberg and sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton, England to New York City. About 1500 lives were lost in this terrible tragedy that captivated the world in its aftermath. In 1985, the Titanic was discovered "lying upright in two pieces on the ocean floor at a depth of about 4,000 m (about 13,000 feet)." (Britannica). A 1993 expedition enabled salvagers to recover several hundred artifacts from the rusting wreck.

The library has many books and movies that explore, through fiction and non-fiction, the Titanic's voyage and demise. A keyword search in the catalog reveals selections for all age groups. A new book, Titanic's Last Secrets: The Further Adventures of Shadow Divers John Chatterton and Richie Kohler, is on order and looks promising.