Shelf Life

Our Shelf Life Blog features the latest recommendations chosen by library staff and volunteers.
Thu, 06/01/2017 - 2:51am
Cover to The Elements: A Visual Encyclopedia of the Periodic Table

DK Publishing and the Smithsonian Institution worked together to create a fascinating book for kids (and adults) who are fascinated by the world around them. The Elements: A Visual Encyclopedia of the Periodic Table makes what could be a dull subject very shiny indeed.

Sure, you have your basic periodic table for quick reference. But every element gets its spotlight, with truly interesting facts and many intriguing photos. Take iridium. It’s a shiny black metal that’s 22 times as dense as water. That’s heavy. You can find it in meteorites, compasses, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and Badlands National Park in South Dakota.

Wed, 05/31/2017 - 8:39am
Little Wolf's First Howling

Little Wolf can barely contain his excitement. "Tonight's the night," says Big Wolf. "Your first howling!" He can't wait to howl at the moon, just like his father Big Wolf! First, Big Wolf demonstrates proper howling form:

"AAAAAAAAOOOOOOOOOOO!"

Big Wolf's howl is perfect! It drifts through the valley and graces the moon. Now it's Little Wolf's turn!

". . . aaaaaaaaaaaaooooooooooo . . . I'm hoooooowling, 'oooowling, 'oooooowling!"

Tue, 05/30/2017 - 2:49am
The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures

For the better part of the 20th century, the card catalog stood as a gateway to the wonders of the library. In The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures, the Library of Congress celebrates the importance of the card catalog throughout library history.

The card catalog is seen as one of the most versatile and durable organizational scheme developed throughout history. It is the map to go to if you want to navigate your way through the vast wilderness of books. Although the beginnings of the card catalog started off slowly, it now covers every subject, from ancient to modern history, in libraries around the world. Peter Devereaux, writer-editor for the Library of Congress, notes that the catalog is a "tangible example of humanity's effort to establish and preserve the possibility of order."

Mon, 05/29/2017 - 2:48am
Dreamfall by Amy Plum

Cata Cordova experiences insomnia. Not just any insomnia, but insomnia from P.T.S.D. The incident that began it all is still fresh in her mind.

Fri, 05/26/2017 - 2:46am
The Adventures of Captain Underpants: The First Epic Novel

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

The Adventures of Captain Underpants: The First Epic Novel by Dav Pilkey
When George and Harold hypnotize their principal into thinking that he is the superhero Captain Underpants, he leads them to the lair of the nefarious Dr. Diaper, where they must defeat his evil robot henchmen. (catalog summary)

Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie is an upcoming 2017 American family film based on the children's novel. The film is being produced by DreamWorks Animation and Scholastic Entertainment with animation production provided by Mikros Image. It is being directed by David Soren, written by Nicholas Stoller, and stars the voices of Ed Helms, Kevin Hart, Nick Kroll, Thomas Middleditch, Jordan Peele and Kristen Schaal. The film is scheduled to be released on June 2, 2017, in 3D and 2D in the United States. See the HD trailer below

Thu, 05/25/2017 - 2:46am
Cover to Soldier Song: A True Story of the Civil War

Two armies faced each other in winter camps across the Rappahannock River. The fighting in December had gone very badly for the Union as they tried to take the Confederate position at Marye’s Heights. Friends and sometimes family had been killed, and the Southern town of Fredericksburg was largely left in ruins.

For months, these two enemy armies went about their business on opposite sides of the river. During those long days and nights, they weren’t firing cannons anymore, but they were sending out volleys of music to lift their soldiers’ spirits. Each side had its patriotic songs. Often they had the same tune but different words, and each side would sing and cheer their own bands.

On those winter nights, they might close with a special tune. One that everyone sang the same words to: “Home, Sweet Home.”

Pages