All branches will be closed Wednesday, December 24 through Friday, December 26. We wish you a happy & safe holiday!

Science Fiction

07/31/2014 - 3:00am
The Return of Zita the Spacegirl by Ben Hatke

The Return of Zita the Spacegirl is Ben Hatke's bittersweet conclusion to his fantastic trilogy of outer space adventure. We find Zita imprisoned on the Dungeon World, sentenced there by a cruel villain with an ulterior motive. Zita has saved thousands of aliens and planets galore, but now Zita will need her friends help in saving her.

02/05/2014 - 2:43pm
Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson

Calamity came to Earth ten years ago in the book Steelheart, by Brian Sanderson. David was eight years old when the entire planet was changed by Calamity and the Epics were created. The Epics were ordinary folks who gained superpowers and were transformed into super villains.

12/23/2013 - 3:02am
Battling Boy by Paul Pope

Battling Boy has twelve t-shirts, each with a different creature emblazoned on the front. Apparently, they give him his powers, but he does not quite know how to use them yet. You see, Battling Boy is in training to be a superhero.

This fact does not offer much solace to the people of the planet Arcopolis. Their children are routinely being kidnapped by a wretched gang of monsters, led by a mummyish kingpin named Sadisto. They used to not have to worry about this sort of thing as much, back when Haggard West was their planet's superhero. Too bad Haggard West is now dead.

07/02/2013 - 8:52am

This author has had enough wild, true-life experiences to fill an entire shelf of books. She grew up helping her parents run a hotel in a part of Yuma, Arizona where all kinds of shady characters hung out. As a kid, she was brilliant, brave, and very sure of herself. Nancy didn’t care for school much. Indeed, she was dyslexic (and undiagnosed) and failed two grades because of it. But as she got older, she did read all the classics in the hotel library. One day when ditching school, Nancy discovered the cool spaces and amazing stories at the public library. Reading took hold of her and never let go.

05/27/2013 - 3:31am
Freakling by Lana Krumwiede

In Taemon's world, the community of Deliverance, all activity and actions take place through the use of telekenesis.For example, no hands are needed when eating. One simply lifts the food into one's mouth through the power of thought. In fact, it is considered unseemly to use one's hands at all in the book Freakling, by Lana Krumweide. Additionally, Taemon is able to harness his psi in a rather unconventional way. He is able to let his mind wander.  This enables him to see into the inner workings of things.  But allowing one's mind to wander is forbidden.Taemon is an out-of-the-box thinker in a world that wants to box everyone in.

10/08/2012 - 8:44am
Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25 by Richard Paul Evans

Michael Vey has a secret.  He and his mother moved away from their home in California so that his secret would not be discovered.  Michael has Tourette's Syndrome, but that is not his secret, though the facial tics that are associated with his condition often make him the subject of bullying and teasing.  On the way home from school one day, Michael encounters some bullies who attempt to beat him up. At that moment, Michael's secret is revealed.  He can harness electricity and send it out of his hands.  This event is witnessed by Taylor, a popular cheerleader.  Taylor confronts Michael at school the next day and questions him about what she saw.  Taylor, it turns out, also has a secret.  In the book, Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25, Richard Paul Evans, introduces us to a different breed of superheroes...teens with superpowers.

09/03/2012 - 3:30am
Starters by Lissa Price

Imagine a future where teens rent their bodies to senior citizens who want to relive the moments of their youth. In Starters by Lissa Price, this is exactly what happens. A genocide spore killed everyone who wasn't vaccinated in time. Left behind are the very young and the very old. Many children are left without parents or caretakers. They must survive in an unfriendly world where they are viewed as unattended minors and are forced to resort to any means possible in order to survive.  If a teen agrees to rent out their body to a senior, they are paid a substantial sum of money. It is very enticing to a starving and homeless teenager.

08/07/2012 - 6:26am
Redshirts by John Scalzi

Oh, John Scalzi, how I love you (~swoons~).  Your likeable characters, intricate but uncomplicated plots, your passion for science fiction. . .   you COMPLETE me.  And your latest offering, Redshirts, does not disappoint.  I knew the moment I read the title oh, so many months ago, that the Trekkie in me would melt at the book's first words.  I was not mistaken.  

Growing up in a military family, Star Trek's flaws were constantly pointed out to me.  That preposterous notion that the entire senior staff would be sent time and again on dangerous missions with no one with any real command experience left in charge.  I didn't care.  Star Trek was cool, like bow ties, fezes, and Stetsons.  But I'm ashamed to say I never did notice the disturbingly high mortality rate of the red-shirted junior officer on away missions.  It wasn't until years later that I heard the term "redshirt" that it occurred to me, oh yeah, those guys were always toast, weren't they?  Still, I never really gave them much thought, save for when I heard someone use the term I could go "Hey, I understood that reference! Yeah, those guys died, like, A LOT, didn't they?"

Pages

Subscribe to Science Fiction