African American

Kwanzaa: A Celebration of Family and Heritage

Kwanzaa, celebrated between December 26 and January 1, is a time for families in the African-American community to come together and enjoy their heritage. Unlike many holidays, Kwanzaa was created by one person, Maulana Karenga, in 1966. He named the celebration Kwanzaa, which means "first fruits" in Swahili.

Slam!

By Walter Dean Myers

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Harris can do it all on the basketball court, and he knows he could be one of the lucky ones to make it all the way to the top. But his failing grades and volatile temper are becoming obstacles to the success he yearns for. Slam's going one-on-one with his future, and it's a showdown he can't afford to lose.
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Once Upon a Time When We Were Colored

By Clifton L. Taulbert

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Clifton Taulbert's loving memoir of life in the colored section of a little Mississippi Delta town has won praise and stirred hearts across the nation, and was turned into a moving and memorable film.

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Pay Yourself First: The African American Guide to Financial Success and Security: Your Easy Steps to Making and Saving More Money

By Jesse B. Brown

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"Achieve your financial freedom with step-by-step instructions from award-winning investment manager Jesse B. Brown. Discover the easy-to-follow, down-to-earth secret to living your dreams, whether it's buying a new home, buying a new car, sending your children to college, retiring rich, or going on that once-in-a-lifetime vacation. Pay Yourself First is a must-have reference guide for all African Americans who want to experience their own financial security. If you make less than $30,000 a year--or if you are simply a first-time investor--here is your financial "411" on: * How to get out of debt and stay out of debt permanently * How to avoid the most common mistakes people make with their money * How to put time and money to work for you instead of against you * Everything you need to know about today's best investment options, including IRAs, insurance, stocks, bonds, and mutual funds"

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Finding Your African American Ancestors

By David T. Thackery

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"Although the search for African American ancestry prior to the Civil War is challenging, the difficulties are not always insurmountable. Finding Your African American Ancestors takes you through your ancestors' transition from slavery to freedom, and helps you find them using the federal census, plantation records, and other helpful sources. The book also considers ways to locate runaway slave advertisements, to identify an ancestor's military regiment, and to access the valuable information from The Freedman's Savings and Trust records."

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The Black Church in the African-American Experience

By C. Eric Lincoln and Lawrence H. Mamiya

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The authors interviewed more than 1,800 black clergy in both rural and urban settings to determine how the seven mainline black denominations have contributed to and reacted to the social changes around them.

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If you like Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree

Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you.

Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree
Growing up in the flamboyant 1980's, Tracy Ellison is a smart and charming teenager who uses her good looks to attract any boy she wants. With a life of promiscuity as she approaches womanhood, she learns valuable lessons that impels her to examine her reckless lifestyle.

If you like Flyy Girl by Omar Tyree you might like:

Boss Lady by Omar Tyree
Boss Lady by Omar Tyree
(follows Flyy Girl)
Rescued by now successful filmmaker Tracy, Vanessa finds herself immune to Hollywood's parties and smooth-talking players. She is at the top of her game, thoroughly in charge, and taking life strictly on her own terms. She tries to persuade Tracy to film Flyy Girl, and Tracy is prepared to do anything to make sure it's done right. (Adult Fiction)

 

 The Coldest Winter Ever by Sister Souljah
The Coldest Winter Ever
by Sister Souljah
Ghetto-born, Winter is the young, wealthy daughter of a prominent Brooklyn drug-dealing family. Quick-witted, sexy, businessminded, and fashionable, Winter knows no restrictions. No one can control her. She's nobody's victim. And her Pops lets her know she deserves the best. No slum jewelry, cheap shoes, or knockoff designer stuff ... Winter knows the Brooklyn streets like she knows the curves of her own body. She maneuvers skillfully, applying all she has learned to come out on top, no matter how dramatically the scenes change. But a cold Winter wind is about to blow her life in a direction she could never have expected. (Adult Fiction)

The First Part Last by Angela Johnson
The First Part Last
by Angela Johnson
Sixteen-year-old Bobby and his girlfriend, Na, had planned to put their baby, Feather, up for adoption, but Feather becomes impossible to relinquish. (Young Adult Fiction)

 
 

A Girl Like Me by Ni-Ni SimoneA Girl Like Me by Ni-Ni Simone
She's got a voice like Keisha Cole, attitude to burn and is the body-rockin', Bebe-sporting girl everyone in her high school wants to be...or be with. But in real life, sixteen-year-old Elite has a crack-addicted mother, no father in sight, and is secretly raising her sister and two brothers on her own. Now a radio contest has put her up-close-and-personal with mega-hot singer Hanseef and their chemistry is too sizzling for Elite to stop pretending. And as the clock ticks down fast for this hood Cinderella, she has only one shot to save her family and make all of her dreams come true. (Young Adult Fiction)

Glitter by Babygirl Daniels
Glitter
by Babygirl Daniels
Asia Smith is still reeling from her rich father's death, but she looks forward to starting high school with her best friend, Tracey, until she loses Tracey in a fight over a boy who subsequently gets her pregnant and dumps her. (Young Adult Fiction)

 

Mules and Men

By Zora Neale Hurston

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Mules and Men is the first great collection of black America's folk world. In the 1930's, Zora Neale Hurston returned to her native village of Eatonville, Florida to record the oral histories, sermons and songs, dating back to the time of slavery, which she remembered hearing as a child. In her quest, she found herself and her history throughout these highly metaphorical folk-tales, big old lies, and the lyrical language of song. With this collection, Zora Neale Hurston has come to reveal and preserve a beautiful and important part of American culture.Zora Neale Hurston (1901-1960) was a novelist, folklorist, anthropologist and playwright whose fictional and factual accounts of black heritage are unparalleled. She is also the author of Tell My Horse, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Dust Tracks on a Road, and Mule Bone.

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Jackie Tales: The Magic of Creating Stories and the Art of Telling Them

By Jackie Torrence

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Jackie Torrence is one of our most treasured storytellers. She performs mostly African American folktales. These sixteen jump tales, Jack tales, Br'er tales, family tales, and scary tales are written in such a way as to give a sense of the telling. Jackie's work is also available on audio and video tape.

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Lockdown

By Walter Dean Myers

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Teenage Reese, serving time at a juvenile detention facility, gets a lesson in making it through hard times from an unlikely friend with a harrowing past.

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