African American

Maggie L. Walker: Pioneering Banker and Community Leader

By Candice F. Ransom

Go to catalog

"Let us be strong and make big plans." These famous words from Maggie L. Walker - best known as the first female bank president in the United States - effectively sum up her story. All her life, Maggie set about making and achieving big plans. She participated in the first black student strike in 1883, led an organization that helped poor African Americans, established a savings bank for them, and helped black people start their own businesses.

Reserve this title

African-Americans in the Colonies

By Jean Kinney Williams

Go to catalog

Contents: Jamestown, Virginia, 1621 -- Slavery becomes an American institution -- Recreating Africa in America -- Freedom at any cost -- Liberty, but not for all.

Reserve this title

Jim Limber Davis: A Black Orphan in the Confederate White House

By Rickey Pittman

Go to catalog

Based on a true story. Jim Limber Davis was rescued from an abusive guardian by Varina Davis when he was only five years old. Jefferson and Varina Davis welcomed him into their home, the Confederate White House, as one of the family, and Jim lived with them until the fall of the Confederacy.

Reserve this title

Slave Laws in Virginia

By Philip J. Schwartz

Go to catalog

Professor Schwartz has written not an out-and-out description of slave laws in Virginia but rather gives a discussion of particular points of the laws, punctuated by specific examples.

Reserve this title

The Seventeenth Child

By Dorothy Marie Rice & Lucille Mabel Walthall Payne

Go to catalog

The oral history of the seventeenth child of black sharecroppers, describing her life in Virginia and New Jersey during the Depression.

Reserve this title

The First Emancipator: The Forgotten Story of Robert Carter, the Founding Father Who Freed His Slaves

By Andrew Levy

Go to catalog

Robert Carter III was born into the highest circles of Virginia's Colonial aristocracy, neighbor and kin to the Washingtons and Lees and a friend and peer to Thomas Jefferson and George Mason. But in 1791, Carter severed his ties with this elite at the stroke of a pen. Having gradually grown to feel that what he possessed was not truly his, clashing repeatedly with his neighbors, his friends, government officials, and, most poignantly, his own family, he set free nearly five hundred slaves in the largest single act of liberation in the history of American slavery before the Emancipation Proclamation.
(From the publisher's description)

Reserve this title

Alvin, Recollections and Reflections

By John Harding, Jr.

Go to catalog
Though listed in our catalog as fiction, this biography interweaves much truth in its retelling of the life of Alvin "Stack" Wormley, an actual person born in 1912 in the Northen Neck. He worked as a farmer, fisherman, oysterman, in a canning factory and fought in World War II. The author knew and liked this man and set down some of his many conversations with him. After Alvin Wormley's death, John Harding, Jr. interviewed his friends and relatives to better tell the tale of an upstanding, uncommon man.
Reserve this title

A Wreath for Emmett Till

By Marilyn Nelson (author) and Philippe Lardy (illustrator)

Go to catalog
A beautiful elegy of fifteen poems and illustrations, honoring Emmett Till, an African American teen from Chicago who was lynched in 1995 while visiting relatives in Mississippi.
Reserve this title

A History of Our Own: Stafford County, Virginia

By Albert Z. Conner, Jr.

Go to catalog
Mr. Conner's book gives Stafford County its own place in American history, from the 17th to the 20th centuries. Filled with photographs and illustrations, this handsome book gives an excellent overview of the county's development and includes noteworthy individuals and events that impacted the area.
Reserve this title

African-American Education in Westmoreland County

By Cassandra Burton

Go to catalog

"...a unique study of the traditions, institutions, and people who were involved in teaching and educating the black population throughout the county. In this volume, with many never-before-published photographs, you will take a visual journey through the area's past and visit the one and two-room schoolhouses of Templemans, Potomac, and some of the smaller areas, such as Frog Hall and Mudbridge; and meet the dedicated and creative teachers and their students who studied and learned in this picturesque region nestled between the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers."
From the publisher's description

Reserve this title