Native Americans

08/04/2016 - 3:14pm
CRRL Guest Picks: John Chinn "Johnny Mac"

"I was born on the banks of the Rappahannock River. Taken Home to White Oak where I was raised and educated in the World's finest three-room university, White Oak School--now known as tribal member, artisan and historian D.P. Newton's Civil War Museum. Spent my time there with the other Patawomecks during World War Two getting lessons between the sounds of the big guns being tested at Dahlgren. They rattled the windows as the concussion came up through our Land. It was the sound of Freedom fighting back. We loved it. Attended Falmouth High and graduated from Stafford High. Graduated from a little Indian School in a place once known as Middle Plantation. Turned 78 nearly a year ago. Not much else to say, except, I am known as Johnny Mac."

07/24/2016 - 7:44am
Priests, Politics, and Health Among Indians in Colonial Virginia

Dr. Jason Sellers, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Mary Washington, will speak on "Priests, Politics, and Health Among Indians in Colonial Virginia" at Headquarters Library on Thursday, August 25 at 7:00. The talk is in conjunction with the interactive exhibit Native Voices: Native Peoples' Concepts of Health and Illness, on display through the end of August.

08/09/2016 - 3:03pm

The public is invited to a talk on "Walking in This World: Native American Social Issues Yesterday and Today," presented by Dr. Karenne Wood at Headquarters Library on Thursday, August 11, at 7:00.

Dr. Wood is a member of the Monacan Indian Nation and Director of Virginia Indian Programs at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. This talk is being held in conjunction with the Native Voices: Native Peoples' Concepts of Health and Illness exhibition, on display through August. Dr. Wood will examine American Indian ways of living in sustainable communities, the administration of justice and peacekeeping, the important roles of women in society, and how children were viewed.  

07/08/2016 - 9:45am
Verifying Native American Ancestry through DNA Testing

“Great-Grandma said we have an Indian princess in the family . . . . “  

Since DNA testing for genealogy began nearly 20 years ago, we have made many leaps and bounds with how, when, and why it can be used. Many Americans have a family story that features the marriage of a Native American into the lineage. Frequently, these stories make us wonder about who we are on the inside.

On Tuesday, August 2, at 7:00, Shannon Combs-Bennett, biologist and genealogist, will discuss what DNA testing could tell you about your ancestry, as well as which test you may want to take to verify your genealogy. An author and frequent lecturer on genealogy, Shannon will present her talk in support of the library’s Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Wellness exhibition.

07/08/2016 - 10:47am
When in Tsenacommacah, Do as the Powhatans

Did Native American barbecue contribute to the success of the English colony at Jamestown?  According to author, historical barbecue consultant, and Patawomeck Indian Tribe member Joe Haynes, the answer is yes! Joe will visit the Headquarters Library on Wednesday, August 3.

He will draw upon numerous historical and contemporary sources to explore some of the lesser-known contributions made to Virginia’s culture and cookery by the Powhatan Indians, who called their land Tsenacommacah. According to Joe, many Virginian foods known to us today, such as smoked pork, hoecakes, and barbecue, all exhibit the unmistakable influence of the Powhatans.

08/04/2016 - 9:40am
Time Travel -- Patawomeck Style

Time travel to the year 1608 in a Patawomeck village set up at the Headquarters Library on Saturday, August 6, between 9:30 and 3:30.

Local Patawomeck tribe members will transform the front lawn of the library into their village as it was when when Captain John Smith sailed up the Rappahannock. Chief John Lightner says, “We take great pride in bringing history to life by creating actual experiences for people. You get a taste of the real thing.”

07/22/2015 - 5:01pm
If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth

If I Ever Get Out of Here centers around Lewis Blake, a Native American teenager in a gifted junior high program. Lewis might be academically successful, but he has no friends. All his white classmates don't have much to say to Lewis, and all of the kids from the reservation are just in the regular classes.

It is 1976, and living outside of Buffalo, New York, Lewis wonders if the area's teachers are going to be surprised when they find that the Native American kids are not that excited about the country's Bicentennial celebration. His family has called this land "home" for much longer than a mere two hundred years.

03/27/2012 - 3:31am
Robert Green, Chief of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe

This interview airs beginning Wednesday, March 28.
The Patawomeck Indians played an important role during the clash over the first Virginia settlement at Jamestown. Robert Green, the 21st century Patawomeck Chief, talks to Debby Klein about his work to preserve the rich lineage of his tribe on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

06/24/2011 - 2:00pm
Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks

Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks is based on the true story of a man from Martha's Vineyard who became the first Native American to graduate from Harvard - in 1665!

Brooks, now a resident of Martha's Vineyard, talks about her inspiration and research for this book.

04/06/2011 - 3:31am
Neither Wolf Nor Dog Cover

Sometimes a book tells a wonderfully enchanting story. Sometimes it is nonfiction and conveys information. There are a few books that are able to do both. Out of those few books that do both, there are a handful that can really cause you to question the reality that you have known as truth. Neither Wolf, Nor Dog, by Kent Nerburn, is one of those special books. 

Nerburn’s book is a true story. When he was a young anthropologist who specialized in Native Americans, he was invited to meet with an Indian Elder in order to write down his thoughts and memories. After Nerburn accepts the challenge, he and Dan, the Lakota elder, begin to go across the Black Hills on a spiritual journey that is both mystical and enlightening.

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