Native Americans

Meet Kaya: an American Girl

By Janet Beeler Shaw

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Kaya dreams of racing her beautiful mare Steps High, but her father warns her that Steps High isn't ready. A pesky boy challenges her anyway, and Kaya enters into the race of her life. This is part of the American Girl series, which includes historical notes.
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Beardream

By Will Hobbs and Jill Kastner (illustrator)

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Spring has come to the Ute village, but Short Tail and his people are concerned because the Great Bear has not awakened. So Short Tail goes into the mountains to find the bear's den. But on the way, Short Tail too falls asleep, and slips into a magical dream in which the Great Bear teaches him a wonderful secret to take back to his people.
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The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses

By Paul Goble (storyteller and illustrator)

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Goble's Caldecott Medal-winning book tells the story of a young Native American girl who is devoted to the care of her tribe's horses. With simple text and brilliant illustrations, Goble reveals how she eventually becomes one of them to forever run free.
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How Coyote Stole the Summer: a Native American folktale

By Stephen Krensky and Kelly Dupre (illustrator)

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Brrr! Coyote is always cold! That's because it's winter all year long. But Old Woman has something amazing called summer. It's tied up in a little bag in her tipi. Coyote and his friends Wolf, Moose, Elk, Stag, and Antelope make a plan to steal summer. But when Coyote grabs the bag, Old Woman's children chase after him. Will his plan work? Will everyone have a chance to share summer's warmth? Find out what happens in this fast-paced tale!
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CRRL Presents: Robert Green, Chief of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe

Robert Green, Chief of the Patawomeck Indian Tribe

This interview airs beginning Wednesday, March 28.
The Patawomeck Indians played an important role during the clash over the first Virginia settlement at Jamestown. Robert Green, the 21st century Patawomeck Chief, talks to Debby Klein about his work to preserve the rich lineage of his tribe on CRRL Presents, a Central Rappahannock Regional Library production.

She Sang Promise: The Story of Betty Mae Jumper, Seminole Tribal Leader

By Jan Godown Annino

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"Betty Mae Tiger Jumper was born in 1923, the daughter of a Seminole woman and a white man. She grew up in the Everglades under dark clouds of distrust among her tribe who could not accept her at first. As a child of a mixed marriage, she walked the line as a constant outsider. Growing up poor and isolated, she only discovered the joys of reading and writing at age 14. An iron will and sheer determination lead her to success, and she returned to her people as a qualified nurse. When her husband was too sick to go to his alligator wrestling tourist job, gutsy Betty Mae climbed right into the alligator pit! Storyteller, journalist, and community activist, Betty Mae Jumper was a voice for her people, ultimately becoming the first female elected Seminole tribal leader."
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How to Research American Indian Blood Lines

By Cecelia Svinth Carpenter

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A manual on Native American genealogical research.

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Friday Book Flick: Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks

Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks

Caleb's Crossing by Geraldine Brooks is based on the true story of a man from Martha's Vineyard who became the first Native American to graduate from Harvard - in 1665!

Brooks, now a resident of Martha's Vineyard, talks about her inspiration and research for this book.

Corn is Maize : the Gift of the Indians

By Aliki

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A simple description of how corn was discovered and used by the Indians and how it came to be an important food throughout the world. Suggested for ages 7-11.
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Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder by Kent Nerburn

Neither Wolf Nor Dog Cover

Sometimes a book tells a wonderfully enchanting story. Sometimes it is nonfiction and conveys information. There are a few books that are able to do both. Out of those few books that do both, there are a handful that can really cause you to question the reality that you have known as truth. Neither Wolf, Nor Dog, by Kent Nerburn, is one of those special books. 

Nerburn’s book is a true story. When he was a young anthropologist who specialized in Native Americans, he was invited to meet with an Indian Elder in order to write down his thoughts and memories. After Nerburn accepts the challenge, he and Dan, the Lakota elder, begin to go across the Black Hills on a spiritual journey that is both mystical and enlightening.