Money

Currency Reader for the Blind

Currency Reader

The U.S. currency reader is on the way! The U. S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) has developed a currency reader for the blind and is partnering with the Library of Congress’ National Library Service for the Blind in order to distribute the free device to people who are already certified for Talking Books. The distribution will begin in January and you should let your librarian know that you are anxious to receive one.

Alexander, who used to be rich last Sunday

By Judith Viorst

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Although Alexander and his money are quickly parted, he comes to realize all the things that can be done with a dollar.
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Debt-Free U: How I Paid for an Outstanding College Education without Loans, Scholarships, or Mooching off My Parents by Zac Bissonnette

Debt-Free U book cover image

If there was one thing that people across the country could agree on right now, it would be the ridiculously high cost of today’s college education. Most parents assume that student loans are a fact of life, and most students assume that student loan debt is a necessary and even positive thing. If you want to get a good job, it’s commonly thought that going to a good college (chosen in part by U.S. News and World Report rankings) and getting a good name on your diploma simply costs money and there’s nothing you can do about it.

Enter Zac Bissonnette. Twenty-one, college student, and an art history major. So what knowledge does he have that the rest of us--and many other experts--do not? Well, as the subtitle of Debt-Free U suggests, Zac paid for his college education, “without loans, scholarships, or mooching off [his] parents.” And you can, too. Because, as it turns out, Zac might know what he’s talking about. He is a writer and editor with AOL Money & Finance, has written for the Boston Globe, appeared on CNN, and has the financial savvy and banking portfolio of someone several times his age.

Federal worker's annuity checks shrinking

Federal worker's annuity checks shrinking

Due to increased federal withholding, federal workers will see a lower number on their annuity checks. Higher health insurance premiums and no cost-of-living adjustments for two years make this change even more noticable.

Retirees can affect the amount of their checks bu adjusting their federal tax withholding deductions at www.opm.gov/retire or by calling 1-888-767-6738. Be aware that changing the amount of withholdings will not change your tax liability.

Circle of Gold

By Candy Dawson Boyd

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Mattie is determined to get her mother a beautiful gold pin for Mother's Day, even though she has not saved enough money and has just lost her job.

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Jobs For Kids: The Guide to Having Fun and Making Money

By Carol Barkin

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A practical guide to making money and having fun doing it-- for kids!

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