Art

This Belongs to Me: Cool Ways to Personalize Your Stuff by Anna Wray

This Belongs to Me: Cool Ways to Personalize Your Stuff by Anna Wray

This Belongs to Me is a DIY designer's dream, offering ideas and suggestions to transform your ordinary belongings into unique, personal reflections of you.

Using paints, pens, clay, and more, Anna Wray offers 14 different projects for you. From a barcode t-shirt to customized earbud headphones, Wray gives you the chance to use your imagination and make a statement with your clothes, accessories, and furniture.

Songs for Drella by Lou Reed and John Cale

Cover to Songs for Drella

Rock music provocateur Lou Reed passed away this week at age 71. Best known for his work with the proto-punk band The Velvet Underground, Reed supplied tough, gritty lyrics while John Cale offered up a dissonant musical journey unlike any heard at the time. Reed and Cale went on to make some transcendent solo albums as well, but my favorite collaboration of theirs will always be Songs For Drella.

Uncle Andy's by James Warhola

Uncle Andy's by James Warhola

Ah, the wacky uncle. He is an institution as old as the concept of family itself. Many can claim to have one, but few can say that his uncle is one of the most important artists of the 20th century. That's where Uncle Andy's, by James Warhola, figures in.

Before Warhol was a painter, a filmmaker, and a celebrity, he was Andrew Warhola. After college, he shortened his name and left his home in Pittsburgh to start an art career in Manhattan. But back in Steel City was Andy's older brother Paul, who worked in a junkyard and was father to seven children, one of whom was our author/illustrator James. Paul used a lot of the trash he found to make sculptures, and if he found something particularly unusual, he would bring it to Andy.

Magic Hours: Essays on Creators and Creation by Tom Bissell

Magic Hours: Essays on Creators and Creation

Tom Bissell's Magic Hours: Essays on Creators and Creations represents the best of what an essay collection can offer: incisive observations about a wide range of intriguing topics, intelligent social commentary that refrains from didacticism, and a good sense of comedic timing. Bissell's essays are characterized by impressive eclecticism. He discusses established cultural figures like Ernest Hemingway, David Foster Wallace, and Werner Herzog, as well as less conventional subjects, such as Tommy Wiseau (the auteur responsible for the cult film The Room), the Underground Literary Alliance, and Jennifer Hale, “the Queen of Video-game Voice-over.” While these topics might seem incurably disparate, Bissell's interest in the process and consequences of creation provides a framework which links them together.

Baby's in Black by Arne Bellstorf

Baby's in Black by Arne Bellstorf

Baby's in Black drops you into a smoke-filled club in Hamburg. Despite the German locale, the band on stage is wailing in English about doing the "hippy hippy shake". Everyone's moving except for the bassist, who looks cooler than James Dean.

The band has been playing for hours, and they will continue for several hours more, as per their contract. They pop pills to stay awake for that long. The group is the Beatles. The year is 1960. The bassist is Stu Sutcliffe.

Jeremy Draws a Monster by Peter McCarty

Jeremy Draws a Monster by Peter McCarty

Jeremy Draws a Monster never gets too scary. The beast in question has some horns and is a bit of a snaggletooth, but his eyes are too tiny to be that threatening. Still, this monster is this one rude dude. Jeremy seemed to just want a friend to play with. He stays inside while other children play soccer. So he takes a fancy pen and draws this creature creation.

A Year in Japan by Kate T. Williamson

A Year in Japan by Kate T. Williamson

Part graphic memoir, part travelogue, A Year in Japan offers a unique perspective on everyday life in Japan. In this charming, whimsical book, Kate T. Williamson adopts a counterintuitive approach to travel writing. Rather than striving to represent the grand, monumental aspects of Japanese culture and history, Williamson focuses on capturing the minutiae--fragmented memories, experiences, and revelations that emerged during the year she spent living in Kyoto. As a Westerner, Williamson has an outsider’s perspective on Japan. But because she had the opportunity to live there and become enmeshed in another way of life, Williamson was able to glean insights and perspectives that would be invisible to your run-of-the-mill tourist. Williamson’s artistic talent also helps concretize her observations, creating an enchanting combination of vivid, unexpected descriptions and beautifully rendered watercolor illustrations.

Portrait Painting Atelier: Old Master Techniques and Contemporary Applications

By Suzanne Brooker

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"The art of portraiture approached its apex during the sixteenth century in Europe with the discovery of oil painting when the old masters developed and refined techniques that remain unsurpassed to this day. The ascendance of nonrepresentational art in the middle of the twentieth century displaced these venerable skills, especially in academic art circles. Fortunately for aspiring artists today who wish to learn the methods that allowed the Old Masters to achieve the luminous color and subtle tonalities so characteristic of their work, this knowledge has been preserved in hundreds of small traditional painting ateliers that persevered in the old ways in this country and throughout the world. Coming out of this dedicated movement, Portrait Painting Atelier is an essential resource for an art community still recovering from a time when solid instruction in art technique was unavailable in our schools.

"Of particular value here is a demonstration of the Old Masters' technique of layering paint over a toned-ground surface, a process that builds from the transparent dark areas to the more densely painted lights. This method unifies the entire painting, creating a beautiful glow that illuminates skin tones and softly blends all the color tones. Readers will also find valuable instruction in paint mediums from classic oil-based to alkyd-based, the interactive principles of composition and photograph-based composition and photograph-based composition, and the anatomy of the human face and the key relationships among its features."

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The Encyclopedia of Oil Painting Techniques

By Jeremy Galton

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"A comprehensive guide to oil painting practice and technique, this reference offers an informative A-to-Z section of valuable skills such as how to build up a painting and how to make brushwork describe forms and textures--as well as a wealth of stimulating ideas for the canvas, including combining oil paints with other media, mixing paint with sand and sawdust, and applying it with such tools as knives, rags, or even the fingers. The second half of the book shows all the techniques in context. Illustrated with a gallery of paintings by well-known artists and full of detailed, step-by-step demonstrations, the guide shows how each artist applies knowledge of oil painting techniques to the interpretation of a subject, whether landscape, portrait, or still life."

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Oil Painting for the Absolute Beginner

By Mark and Mary Willenbrink

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"Oil painting doesn't have to be difficult! This is a no-fear, no-experience-required guide to enjoyable painting and happy results, from first strokes to finished paintings. The DVD workshop features the author creating two paintings from start to finish."

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