Deafness

Kasher in the Rye by Moshe Kasher

Kasher in the Rye by Moshe Kasher

If memoirs are written to both connect with the reader and exorcise the writer's personal demons, then Moshe Kasher had one gigantic, stinky, firebreathing, sword-wielding demon.

His debut book's title says it all: Kasher in the Rye: The True Tale of a White Boy from Oakland Who Became a Drug Addict, Criminal, Mental Patient, and Then Turned 16. Sure the Salinger-inspired pun is as obvious as a rhino stampede, but Moshe Kasher has had quite a colorful life. A life that I would not want to wish on my worst enemy.

Now a stand-up comic, Kasher was born to not one, but two, deaf parents. Mom and Dad separated within a year of his birth, and his mother took him and his older brother from Brooklyn to Oakland where a life of food stamps, less than stellar public schools, and years of therapy awaited them. This menagerie of elements was perfect for young Moshe (who at the time went by the less-Semitic name Mark) to rebel.

I'll Scream Later

By Marlee Matlin

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"From Children of a Lesser God to Dancing with the Stars, Academy Award®–and Golden Globe–winning actress Marlee Matlin shares her incredible life story in a moving and often surprising memoir, I'll Scream Later. More than twenty years after becoming the youngest woman to win a Best Actress Oscar for her stunning performance as Sarah Norman, the pupil-turned-custodian at a school for the Deaf in Children of a Lesser God, Marlee Matlin continues to be an inspirational force of nature.

"A working mother, wife, activist, and role model, she takes readers on the frank and touching journey of her life, from the sudden and permanent loss of her hearing at eighteen months old to the highs and lows of Hollywood, her battles with addiction, and the unexpected challenges of being thrust into the spotlight as an emissary for the Deaf community. With uncompromising honesty, she reveals the shocking incidents of molestation that took her years to reconcile; her passionate and tumultuous relationship with Oscar winner William Hurt; her romances with Rob Lowe, Richard Dean Anderson, and David E. Kelley; and much more. As fresh and invigorating as her memorable television roles on Seinfeld, The West Wing, The L Word, and her dazzling turn on Dancing with the Stars, Marlee Matlin’s self-portrait captures the chutzpah and humor of a celebrated actress who continues to defy all expectations."

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Beethoven: The Composer as Hero

By Philippe A. Autexier

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To be a musician and to be deaf: that alone would have made Beethoven a tragic hero. But his heroic stature goes beyond the pathos of his condition. Beethoven left his mark in his magnificent sonatas, symphonies, and his chamber music--among the most beautiful ever written. Set against the stormy background of European political upheaval, the intellectual ferment of Vienna, and the love affairs, friendships, and quarrels of his private life, here is the story of Beethoven, the father of Romantic music.

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Reluctant Genius: Alexander Graham Bell and the Passion for Invention

By Charlotte Gray

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Inventor of the telephone and teacher of the hearing impaired, Bell kept his summer home at Colonial Beach in Westmoreland County, now a bed & breakfast inn.
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The Cat Who Escaped from Steerage: A Bubbemeiser

By Evelyn Wilde Mayerson

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Living in the steerage section of a steamship bound for America, Chanah and her deaf cousin try to keep their newly found cat a secret.

Suggested for ages 8 - 12

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Dad and Me in the Morning

By Patricia Lakin

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A deaf boy and his father share a special time as they watch the sun rise at the beach.

Suggested for ages 4 - 8

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