Presidents

Cherries Jubilee!

Tart or sweet, cherries are the berries! Well, they're not really berries. Cherries actually belong to the rose family. Cherry's rosy relatives include other stone fruits such as almonds, apricots, plums, peaches, and nectarines.

February is a terrific month to dig into cherries. For years, people have made cherry pies to celebrate George Washington's birthday. Why do we think of cherries when we think of our first president?

The President’s House, 1800 to the Present: A First Daughter Shares the History and Secrets of the World's Most Famous Home, by Margaret Truman

The President's House cover

A customer recently called me to tell me that he loved The President’s House, by Margaret Truman, so when I gave a talk in Northern Virginia a few days later, I passed on the recommendation to the group. The next customer who read it just called to tell me that he is really enjoying this book, too. Several of the book reviews said that it is a fun and interesting look at the White House written by a woman who has a deep love for this national icon because she was lucky enough to grow up there. 

The Worst of Friends: Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and the True Story of an American Feud

By Suzanne Tripp Jurmain

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John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were good friends with very different personalities. But their differing views on how to run the newly created United States turned them into the worst of friends. They each became leaders of opposing political parties, and their rivalry followed them to the White House.
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The Presidential Election: How It Works

It takes almost two years from the time the candidates announce they are running to the day that one of them will be sworn into office. Let's take a look at how the winning candidate will get there.

I Grew Up to Be President

By Laurie Calkhoven

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From George Washington to Barack Obama, this child's is a child's perfect introduction to all of the U.S. Presidents. On every spread, readers will learn about the Presidents' childhoods, families, careers, accomplishments in office, and life after the White House. Famous quotes, major events, and fun facts are all included.

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Lives of the Presidents: Fame, Shame (And What the Neighbors Thought)

By Kathleen Krull

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Presents the lives of the presidents, focusing on their roles as parents, husbands, pet owners, and neighbors, while also including humorous anecdotes about hairstyles, attitudes, diets, fears, and sleep patterns.
Now fully updated, this entertaining glance at presidential history includes new chapters and artwork for Barack Obama and George W. Bush, along with a fabulous new jacket and refreshed design.
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Gerald R. Ford

By Douglas Brinkley

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"The 'accidental' president whose innate decency and steady hand restored the presidency after its greatest crisis When Gerald R. Ford entered the White House in August 1974, he inherited a presidency tarnished by the Watergate scandal, the economy was in a recession, the Vietnam War was drawing to a close, and he had taken office without having been elected. Most observers gave him little chance of success, especially after he pardoned Richard Nixon just a month into his presidency, an action that outraged many Americans, but which Ford thought was necessary to move the nation forward.

"Many people today think of Ford as a man who stumbled a lot--clumsy on his feet and in politics--but acclaimed historian Douglas Brinkley shows him to be a man of independent thought and conscience, who never allowed party loyalty to prevail over his sense of right and wrong. As a young congressman, he stood up to the isolationists in the Republican leadership, promoting a vigorous role for America in the world. Later, as House minority leader and as president, he challenged the right wing of his party, refusing to bend to their vision of confrontation with the Communist world. And after the fall of Saigon, Ford also overruled his advisers by allowing Vietnamese refugees to enter the United States, arguing that to do so was the humane thing to do. Brinkley draws on exclusive interviews with Ford and on previously unpublished documents (including a remarkable correspondence between Ford and Nixon stretching over four decades), fashioning a masterful reassessment of Gerald R. Ford's presidency and his underappreciated legacy to the nation."

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White House Diary

By Jimmy Carter

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"The edited, annotated diary of President Jimmy Carter; filled with insights into his presidency, his relationships with friends and foes, and his lasting impact on issues that still preoccupy America and the world. Each day during his presidency, Jimmy Carter made several entries in a private diary, recording his thoughts, impressions, delights, and frustrations. He offered unvarnished assessments of cabinet members, congressmen, and foreign leaders; he narrated the progress of secret negotiations such as those that led to the Camp David Accords. When his four-year term came to an end in early 1981, the diary amounted to more than five thousand pages. But this extraordinary document has never been made public; until now. By carefully selecting the most illuminating and relevant entries, Carter has provided us with an astonishingly intimate view of his presidency."

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Reagan

By David Ogden Stiers and David McCullough

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The story of Ronald Reagan's life, with comments by contemporaries and historians. Vol. l. Lifeguard (128 min.) -- Vol. 2. An American crusade (150 min.)

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With Reagan: The Inside Story

By Edwin Meese

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Former attorney general Edwin Meese began his political life as California Governor Reagan's legal advisor in 1966. In this memoir, he credits Reagan with the downfall of the Soviet Union as well as a surge in economic vitality in the 1980s.

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