Plays

Lapsed Catholics and Stray Bullets: The Works of Martin McDonagh

Lapsed Catholics and Stray Bullets: The Works of Martin McDonagh

For the past two decades, Martin McDonagh has established himself as a sensational writer of emotional disturbance and darkly funny exchanges in his Irish-set plays and crime-focused films. He may not be a household name, but that name already has an Academy Award and several Tony nominations under its belt. We have a number of his works in the collection worth recommending.

 

Written in the mid-Nineties, The Beauty Queen of Leenane and Other Plays offers a trilogy of stories centered around the same town and immediately shows McDonagh's gifts for cleverly inane banter and simmering tensions.

The Tempest

By William Shakespeare

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Prospero, the Duke of Milan, has been banished from his own kingdom to a remote island with his daughter. After many years, chance and a magical tempest bring the malefactors to the island where Prospero plans to avenge all wrongs.
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The Tragedy of King Lear

By William Shakespeare

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A king foolishly divides his kingdom between his two scheming eldest daughters and estranges himself from the daughter who loves him. So begins this profoundly moving and disturbing tragedy that, perhaps more than any other work in literature, challenges the notion of a coherent and just universe.
Banned from the English stage from 1788-1820 out of respect to King George III's alleged insanity.
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The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People

By Oscar Wilde

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Oscar Wilde's brilliant play makes fun of the English upper classes with light-hearted satire and dazzling humor. The play focuses on Jack and Algernon, two young men in love with girls both determined to marry someone named Ernest.

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Riot

By Walter Dean Myers

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In 1863, fifteen-year-old Claire, the daughter of an Irish mother and a black father, faces ugly truths and great danger when Irish immigrants, enraged by the Civil War and a federal draft, lash out against blacks and wealthy "swells" of New York City.

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Arthur Miller: Modern Theater's Fiery Spirit

Throughout the 1950s, a generation of artists, many of whom had helped America triumph during World War II, recoiled in horror from the growth of faceless corporations, government watchdogs, and bigoted citizens' groups. The pounding of the keys of hundreds of typewriters sounded a cadence of rebellion. They resisted the new order and created a road of written pages which gave other rebellious souls encouragement for the revolution to come. Arthur Miller was in the forefront.